12 Steps To Hiring A Social Media Manager

themaria
Maria Ogneva Head of Community, Sidecar

Posted on August 30th 2010

I think we can all agree by now that social media is here to stay. As such, the importance of formulating a social media strategy, executing on it, educating and aligning the whole organization, is paramount. This is why your social media manager / director is going to be a crucial hire. Someone asked me on Wednesday night at the SFAMA event: "How do I find someone good to lead social media and community building efforts? What are some success characteristics?" This is a very big question, and one I hear often, so I thought it merited its own blogpost. First of all, let me preface the below by saying that some of the characteristics for success in your field will be particular to you, as well as a lot of the differences will be dictated by whether you are a B2C or a B2B (otherwise known as B2B2C) organization. Based on my observation, however, all successful social media and community people share the following characteristics (although this post skews a bit more to social media management than community management). There are definitely overlaps between social media and community management, but it's important to realize that they are fairly distinct disciplines. For differences between community management and social media management, check out a post I've written, as well as this post by Rachel Happe.
  1. Passion: You may agree or disagree here, but I think the single most important characteristic in any people-facing job is passion. If you are truly passionate, you will easily develop a lot of the other characteristics below, as well as learn competencies. It's also one of the most difficult characteristics to fake; if you aren't passionate, people can tell. There are several reasons why passion is paramount. Firstly it's an all-consuming job, so if you really don't love it with every fiber of your being, it will be drudgery and you will burn out quicker than you type your next tweet. Secondly, people can tell when you don't really care, and if you are in the frontlines evangelizing your company, you won't garner enough credibility in the market. Passion is contagious, and the best sales people are the natural ones. At the same time the toughest sales job you will ever do is on yourself; so if you are truly passionate, committed and knowledgeable, you won't have trouble influencing others without "selling".
  2. Domain expertise and credibility: As I mention above, the passionate person with a strong capacity for learning, will learn competencies particular to your company quickly. Therefore, don't make a mistake of hiring based on a couple of technical skills over the characteristics in this article -- those can always be taught. However, you do need to evaluate this person's professional credibility in the general space you are in. I'd certainly recommend listening to social media conversations to understand who the formidable bloggers, thought and conversation leaders are, and either hire them or rely on their word-of-mouth recommendations. Because this person will be the "face" of your company, you want to make sure they are credible and know what they are talking about. Check out this brief video I created on finding the right people through social media.
  3. Natural Evangelism: Following from above (passion and credibility), your social media / community manager will be an evangelist of your company and  your products. Because this person will represent your company in many ways, ensure that this person's value system, brand and voice are consistent with your brand and value system.
  4. Service DNA: Because this person is the face of your company, (s)he needs to be infallibly committed to helping people in social channels. Your customers, prospects, partners, analysts, etc. will ask for your help and advice, and you need to be there. In reality, there's oftentime more than one person can handle, and we'll talk about building a team a little later. It's important for this person to realize that customer service is the new marketing, and to be able to instill these values in the rest of the company.
  5. Personal, personable, firm and respectable: Related to the above, your "face" has to be approachable enough for people to want to connect with. This person will be the proverbial "guy/gal you'd love to have a beer (or carrot juice) with".  At the same time, this person is not a pushover, and knows how to establish boundaries effectively. Being service oriented does not mean that you will entertain foul behavior, or cater to trolls.
  6. Thirsty for knowledge and committed to education: Social tech move at breakneck speed these days; there's a new social network or product, it seems, daily. As a social media practitioner, you must keep your toolset full of sharp new tools, but also must have enough experience to tell what's a real trend and what's a shiny new object that will burn out in 3 months.
  7. Risk tolerance, ability to fail fast: The fast-changing landscape of social technology also necessitates more and faster course-correction. It's absolutely crucial to commit to social media programs and stay with them long enough to evaluate their success or failure. However, it's just as important to remain flexible and nimble, allowing to course-correct. Your social media leader must be comfortable with constant change and failing fast, because the faster you fail, the faster you learn and move on to something that works.
  8. Balance of perfectionism with a bias for action: To say that the social media world expects real-time is an obvious statement.  Therefore, your social media leader should have a definite bias for action. While creating quality content is important, it's equally as important to avoid going into analysis paralysis or get caught in an endless loop of approvals. I am certainly not advocating publishing blogposts without proofreading them; I am simply saying that if perfection means inaction, you should choose action. If you wait on publishing blogpost or tweet, it will indeed be yesterday's news tomorrow.
  9. Advocate for community and for the company: Your social media leader is in a unique position to be an advocate for both, the company / brand and the community. Although some may think the two goals compete with each other, they really do not. When you are an advocate for the community, you help the company design better products and services. Therefore, you are able to evangelize on behalf of the company more naturally. Providing an excellent and customizable customer experience makes the customer happy, boosting advocacy, loyalty and revenues, and in turn making the company happy.
  10. Strategic: You should hire your social media leader with the expectation that this person will set the strategy for the whole company, ensuring that the right things get done, and that the people inside the company are working together like a well-oiled machine. Strategic, big picture thinking, coupled with the willingness to roll up sleeves and execute, is a must for this position. Either eventually, or from the beginning, this person will be managing other social media and community managers to help execute. Because of its strategic importance, this position will need to provide leadership for senior management as well.
  11. Business savvy: The problem with a lot of self-proclaimed social media "experts" is that they lack a broad-based business education. Ensure that your hire has a general business savvy and understands marketing, sales, operations, P&L, product management, business process and customer support fundamentals. Social media is not a silo, and being able to understand its relationship to other business functions is critical.
  12. Innovative self-starter: Especially if this position is new to company, and because a lot of social efforts are still in uncharted territory, this person can't wait for directions from the boss. Oftentimes, directions from the boss won't come at all, because this person will know more about social media than the C-suite. Leading change, being able to build something from nothing, setting and executing strategy, sometimes in the face of internal skepticism, are not easy tasks. Even though it's important for this person to self-direct, the direction has to be consistent with the overall business's strategy.
The above is a tall order, and to be frank, there are not too many people who fit the bill. Because it's a big job that requires a lot of creativity and nerves of steel, you need to ensure that you are providing the right environment for your social media leader to succeed.
  • Support from the C-suite: Many social media initiatives fizzle before they are ever born, because the there's not enough buy-in from senior management. Make sure that social media is embraced and looked upon as a strategic endeavor, and not just a cost center or a fad. As such, your social media leader needs to also have access to the right decision makers, because cross-functional collaboration is required.
  • Work hours and locations that make sense: The old paradigm of 9-5 is no longer true. Social is on at all times, and many social media people have schedules that are truly erratic. Don't require your social media people to be in the  office 9-5 (with the exception to face-to-face meetings), but rather give them the flexibility to get the work done at times and in locations that are appropriate for the job. Give your social media people the ability to be creative on their own terms; if they really know what they are doing, they will know what's best.
  • Feedback tolerance: You have to be open to feedback and willing to listen to the unpleasant. Remember that oftentimes, this person will have a unique insight from the community's point of view, and you should listen and learn from this feedback, even when it's uncomforable. The transparency of social media brings a proverbial mirror to your face and exposes more flaws in your organization than otherwise would come to light. And that's OK. However, it's not OK to not make changes based on what you learn.
  • Commit to ongoing learning: Like with all other knowledge workers, you need to commit to supporting this person's ongoing education: with time, as well as money.
  • Empower personal branding: In social media, the distinction between personal and professional is blurry at best. You need to be comfortable with this person's personal brand and its relationship to the company brand, and give him / her latitude to grow both.
  • Have realistic expectations: More than likely, you will not have an Old Spice type success overnight. Building community and relationships via social media is just like building any other relationship: it's hard work, daily, and over time. There are no shortcuts, and you need to realize that. While there are certainly tactical things you can do in social media, your investment in it should be similar to your investment in email and phone. After all, social media is a communication channel, and not a broadcast channel.

So what do you think? Did I leave something out that's important to you? What do you think are some success characteristics? The comments are yours!

Photo credit: moionet

Link to original article

themaria

Maria Ogneva

Head of Community, Sidecar

Nice to meet you! I'm a community management practitioner and strategist, and I believe in the power of movements that can spring up at the intersection of passion, behavior and technology. Currently I work as Head of Community at Sidecar, a community marketplace for people to give and get rides from their mobile phone. My job is to help create the conditions where our drivers and riders benefit from working together and with us as a company. Before Sidecar, I built the Yammer global online community from the ground up, and worked at Salesforce as "Adoption Czar" helping companies evolve their own community best practices. You can follow me on Twitter at @themaria or on my blog socialsilk.com.

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Comments

Posted on August 30th 2010 at 3:54PM

I could not have written this any better!  I have all 10 attributes and I'm very proud to say so. But you hit the nail on the head about the "work hours and locations". I can't stress to my manager enough that it's so not an ideal situation to have me in the office M-F 9-5. I'm best to work in my own little quiet corner, where i can gather my thoughts and execute. I'm creative and I can get a bit antsy sometimes, when i'm home I can run around, do some jumping jacks or something and go back to focusing. I can't do that sitting in this cubicle.

Anyway, thanks for writing this article. I knew I wasn't alone.

 

 

pricey.johndoe
Posted on August 30th 2010 at 10:27PM

Great piece and spot on. I think it's important not to underestimate the importance of accessibiltiy to decision makers as well though. In bigger organisations it's easy for somone with the 12 points listed to still get steamrolled by the need to demonstrate ROI before an idea is even considered - makes it a bit difficult to practise 'trial and error' learnings which is what social marketing requires.

Posted on August 31st 2010 at 12:58PM

great post.

i have to admit that one of the criticisms i have about this site is that some posts are not post at all but 1 paragraph snippets that convey very little. this post was extensive and a good read.

thanks

Mlconley
Posted on August 31st 2010 at 4:48PM

Great article, spot on is right! I truly hope your advice becomes integrated into the hiring practices for all Social Media Managers. 

jamidix
Posted on August 31st 2010 at 9:35PM

Really great post.  I've been working in a private school doing fundraising for 10 years and have an incredible good raport with most of our parents.  I love meeting new people and building those relationships and would love to take those skills to a new level through social media. I also am currently responsible for our FB page.  Any suggestions or thoughts on how to do that? 

Katie Urbain
Posted on September 1st 2010 at 2:30PM

Hi Maria,

I love this article it is so spot on! Where I have seen the hiring process fail most often is #11. I've seen focus being placed solely on the persons writing and communications  - with zero attention paid to their marketing, business, and self-starter ability.

I would be so bold to say that without the Marketing knowledge or sensabilities it just doesn't work. You have to be you - but you have to be able to put yourself in the shoes of your followers and be able to think critically about how they will respond to what you say.

 

Posted on September 2nd 2010 at 9:29AM

Excellent post. There are a lot of companies out there right now searching for the right candidate for a social media role. This article offers some great food-for-thought. Thanks!

Posted on September 2nd 2010 at 11:52AM

Great article. I myself am a Social Media Specialist and the most frustrating experience I have run into thus far in looking to apply for Social Media Manager positions is the laundry list of experience. I graduated college a year and a half ago, but have been in a social media position through internships, as a communication specialist and now as a social media specialist for a university. I remember I was about to head to college when Facebook was taking off, and Youtube was created my freshman year of college, Twitter two years after that. I don't know too many in the social media field who have been doing social media for five years.

 

If you are hiring, don't overlook aspiring, passionate individuals who are young but experienced in social media (we've grown up with it, know the language, are digital natives and with a public relations or business background can make a great candidate).

Posted on September 2nd 2010 at 11:54AM

A very nice summary and as you state a very tall order to fill...we stress business skills as the top qualification because that is what our clients expect.

Way back in May 2009, we blogged about what it takes to get hired in Social Media and had a nice comment discussion on this topic.  (Here is the link if you are interested: http://impactinteractions.com/best-practices/the-new-reality-what-it-takes-to-get-hired-in-social-media/410)

In short, focus on the goals for why the company uses social media, then understand how to measure the efforts, then select tools and content to realize those goals. To do that, you'll need quite a bit of skill... and there aren't too many folks who do right now...

Posted on September 2nd 2010 at 11:59AM

great article! thanks for the knowlege...

Posted on September 2nd 2010 at 12:00PM

Maria,

Great post. I just wanted to re-iterate 2 points you make - which for me working with clients on social recruiting projects, are so important.

They are passion and evangelism for social media. If they haven't got both, then don't bother - just don't waste your time. You cannot train people with either, and in my opinion for this role to be a success, they need both in abundance!

Too many times recently I have seen companies 'empower' employees with this job. The trouble is they are just not interested ENOUGH! Yes they are interested, but not REALLY interested enough to go that extra mile for you.

So if the person in front of you is not passionate about social media or is willing to tell the world (well not literally, but nearly!) about it, then stop the interview there and then!! (In fact, why did you even interview them in the process?)

Andy

 

 

 

 

Posted on September 2nd 2010 at 12:14PM

Very good post. Having embodied this role for the past several years on behalf of my organization, and having done extensive training and presentations for other businesses/organizations using and hiring for social media,  I see validity in every point (am I biased thinking it's a great list because I think I fit each bullet point?!).

I would also add grammar, spelling and punctuation!  You don't want your front line to be semi-literate. And on the blue sky list: broad knowledge base (the ability to connect ideas, draw on cultural/literary/etc. references), quick wit, cultural sensitivity...  Again, I may be bised, but as with your point about business savvy ("The problem with a lot of self-proclaimed social media 'experts' is that they lack a broad-based business education"), these experiences and traits and skills often come with age (not necessarily, but often). This is why I often emphasize to businesses that "hiring a young person to do social media" may not be your wisest choice. Good post, thank you.

Posted on September 2nd 2010 at 12:15PM

So spot on, I have nothing to add. You captured everything I would have said. I think many of your points apply for hiring emarketing staff and consultants, as well as social media staff members.I plan to provide this article for my clients as an evaluation tool to use to measure my work and the work of their internal staff.

GREAT post!

Fran Simon
http://www.ESbyFS.com

Posted on September 2nd 2010 at 12:20PM

This post is an interesting take on the subject ... I did a presentation about 6 months or so ago at a "digital marketing for the property industry" conference, and focussed on the skill set a social media professional needs.

It's more of a "day in the life" approach to make it a bit more intuitive in terms of what people do every day on the job - may be an interesting alternative approach to the discussion. Focussed more on ability to get messaging and tone right.

Slides at http://www.slideshare.net/SentientCommunications/social-media-in-real-life

(it's pretty short).

 

Posted on September 2nd 2010 at 12:20PM

Great article. I might add the 13th step. Hire me. :-)

Posted on September 2nd 2010 at 12:21PM

Great article! But I might add a 13th step: hire me! :-)

laurapope_
Posted on September 2nd 2010 at 12:25PM

Great article! But I might add a 13th step: hire me! :-)

Posted on September 2nd 2010 at 12:38PM

Wow, awesome list. I did social media for Zillow.com for several years, and this list is spot spot on in terms of what's needed and what companies should be looking for.

Posted on September 2nd 2010 at 12:42PM

Well done Maria! I have always used #11 as a differentiator when talking to social media marketing consulting prospects. It makes a tremendous difference to be able to help them formulate a social media marketing plan within the context of their business (and depending on the size of the company - their personal life plan).

All 11 points are excellent. I would go a bit further with #5. Before the days of social media, I was known for having the largest number of influential face to face connections in my community. How did that happen? Easily meeting people and genuinely enjoying them. A social media manager is a personality. There are some people who think that a social media manager need never be seen in public. I disagree. They should be someone you are proud to have associated with your brand and happy to have out there networking IRL (in real life) - of course with smart phone in hand - as well as from behind their computer.

Posted on September 2nd 2010 at 12:54PM

Great post. I'd add: don't hire anyone that calls themselves a social media scientist, pro, guru, specialist, advisor, star, ninja or evangelist. 

Posted on September 2nd 2010 at 1:03PM

Great post. Thank you. I'd also suggest avoiding my pet hate: those that refer to themselves as social media scientists, pros, gurus, stars, ninjas or evangelists. You want those that walk the walk, not just talk the self-prophesying talk.

 

Posted on September 2nd 2010 at 1:05PM

Great post. Thank you. Can I also suggest avoiding those that refer to themselves as social media scientists, pros, gurus, specialists, stars, ninjas and evangelists. You want those that walk the walk, not the ones that talk the self-prophesying talk.

 

Posted on September 2nd 2010 at 2:40PM

And hire someone who has had experience with the Web/PR. Don't hire people who are just jumping on the social media bandwagon.

I don't forsee social media to continue growing in its current form. Historical data indicates that there has to be trackability and revenue models in place for a certain 'business model' to surivive. Social will definitely be here, but in a different form and structure where proven knowledge base and track record will be needed to survive.

Bilal Jaffery

Digital Strategy at IBM

themaria
Posted on September 12th 2010 at 11:08PM

Hi Bilal!

Definitely never hire the "social media guru". This is why I said that it's critical for this person to understand business fundamentals. Social media doesn't just exist in a vacuum. 

Re: trackability... There are certain ways that ROI can be measured, and should be measured. We are actually doing a webinar on this shortly. However, you also need to invest in the "unglamorous", day-to-day social media stuff, like answering customers' questions on Twitter, etc. In this use case, I liken it to email, phone, instant chat, or however else you serve your customers and constituents. They don't necessarily have an ROI, just a communication method. But you can and should track improvements in speed of response, % of queries answered, customer satisfaction, etc. I think smart companies area already tracking their social media, or at least investing time to learn; I work in social media monitoring and measurement, so I can definitely attest to that.

Cheers!

- Maria

Posted on September 2nd 2010 at 3:08PM

Well done Maria! I have always used #11 as a differentiator when talking to social media marketing consulting prospects. It makes a tremendous difference to be able to help them formulate a social media marketing plan within the context of their business (and depending on the size of the company - their personal life plan).


All 11 points are excellent. I would go a bit further with #5. Before the days of social media, I was known for having the largest number of influential face to face connections in my community. How did that happen? Easily meeting people and genuinely enjoying them. A social media manager is a personality. There are some people who think that a social media manager need never be seen in public. I disagree. They should be someone you are proud to have associated with your brand and happy to have out there networking IRL (in real life) - of course with smart phone in hand - as well as from behind their computer.

Posted on September 2nd 2010 at 3:21PM

Maria, I'm interested in becoming a social media manager at some time in the future, so am really appreciative of the part where you address the environment organizations should try to have for social media managers.

themaria
Posted on September 12th 2010 at 11:02PM

Thanks, Ed! Best of luck to you in your social media future!

- Maria

LindaSherman
Posted on September 2nd 2010 at 3:28PM

Well done Maria! I have always used #11 as a differentiator when talking to social media marketing consulting prospects. It makes a tremendous difference to be able to help them formulate a social media marketing plan within the context of their business (and depending on the size of the company - their personal life plan).


All 11 points are excellent. I would go a bit further with #5. Before the days of social media, I was known for having the largest number of influential face to face connections in my community. How did that happen? Easily meeting people and genuinely enjoying them. A social media manager is a personality. There are some people who think that a social media manager need never be seen in public. I disagree. They should be someone you are proud to have associated with your brand and happy to have out there networking IRL (in real life) - of course with smart phone in hand - as well as from behind their computer.

Posted on September 2nd 2010 at 4:42PM

Maria,

I have been working within an agency since April to help build their social media program within the interactive department and this article was spot on.  I was nodding my head the entire time.  From my experience, I've noticed it is also advantageous to have worked on both the client-side and the agency-side.  That way the individual has seen social media and how it works from both sides.  If they're trying to build a department from the ground up (my current situation), they know which things can be outsourced and which tasks should remain in-house.

Thanks for the great post!  Really enjoyed it.

 

themaria
Posted on September 12th 2010 at 10:56PM

Hi Liz!

Thanks for sharing your experiences. In-house vs. outsourced -- wow, that's a great area that still remains misunderstood. I have many thoughts on this; I can hear a blogpost popcorning up. Kudos to you for building from the ground up. That's what I'm doing as well (not agency side, though).

Cheers, and keep on keeping on!

- Maria

Posted on September 2nd 2010 at 7:06PM

Hi Maria,

What a great post. Very good for both people looking to hire a social media manager AND social media companies as well, to understand what is required by clients. I especially like the part about the manager having business savvy - a person that understands marketing, sales, operations, P&L, product management, business process and customer support fundamentals. This person will inevitably touch on all of these important parts of a business and must have some knowledge of how a business runs.

 

themaria
Posted on September 12th 2010 at 10:54PM

David - 

Absolutely! What you just said! Social media is not a silo and definitely needs to work with everyone inside the organization. Social media can only be successful when it's driven by people from all over the organization, but the social media director will always be the hub of all this.

cheers!

- Maria

Posted on September 2nd 2010 at 8:49PM

This is pretty much me in a nutshell. Well most of it anyway! I certainly found a bit of direction to apply to my social media ways (I'm quite new to it all, but I'm building up slowly). Great read there.

themaria
Posted on September 12th 2010 at 10:51PM

Keep on building! Thanks for stopping by!

- Maria

Posted on September 3rd 2010 at 2:08AM

Thank you! I read this to see how I would score myself in an imaginary interview, and I think I am in with a pretty good chance of getting the job!

All 12 points are certainly traits and skills I believe are indeed vital for a Social Media Manager, and the sooner Businesses understand the value in a strategic, focussed presence in Social Media, the larger the benefits to those Businesses will be.

Too often I have seen Businesses spend glorious amounts of time and money on Traditional Media Ad Space, and then ask the Receptionist to set up a Facebook Page and put stuff on it. (OK, it's an overstatement, and I am in no way looking to devalue the role of a receptionist, they are all awesome!) But I'll use an old saying, "If a job's worth doing, it's worth doing right"

I'm going to print this blog post off and hand it to my prospective clients after my presentation and say, 'If you think I fit this bill, if you have seen and heard my passion, let's drive this forwards!'

Thanks Maria.

themaria
Posted on September 12th 2010 at 10:50PM

Thanks, Jerry! Absolutely, it's worth doing right! The problem with social media is that because it's free to use, people think that it's free. But it's not. It costs the time of the people who are driving it. And time is money. So unless you can invest in someone's salary, better to not even do it half-way.

When you print it, just don't spend too much paper :) Emailing blog URL's is great for saving trees :)

Cheers!

- Maria

Posted on September 3rd 2010 at 9:09AM

Kudos Maria! Well, a must-have and a must-be-kept and ... quite a gem for twitter. ;-)

Could be a piece of work for businesses (all kind of) who may need perspectives and insight when dealing with (their) social media.

Laura

themaria
Posted on September 12th 2010 at 10:47PM

Thanks, Laura!

Julia Mitchell
Posted on September 5th 2010 at 3:06AM

Good article thank you for sharin.

themaria
Posted on September 12th 2010 at 10:46PM

Thanks, Julia!

Posted on September 6th 2010 at 2:15AM

Thanks for the excellent post. Especially I liked the fact that you had also highlighted the importance of providing the necessary working environment and circumstances for the new social media leader. Too often the new ideas fall on knees in front of a stiff management resistant to change.

themaria
Posted on September 12th 2010 at 10:46PM

Tuija: glad you found this useful! You are absolutely right! A successful partnership between a company and its social media leader has to be 2-way. Both parties need to be committed to success in social media, and both need to provide steps to ensure everyone can work together.

 

Cheers!

 

- Maria

Posted on September 7th 2010 at 8:18AM

Seeing as I am shortly going on maternity leave and we are in the process of finding my replacement I was interested to read the title of this blog post. It hit the nail on the head perfectly. All 12 attributes are ciritical not only to what I am currently doing at work, but also to the person who has to step into my shoes whilst I am away. I couldn't have put it better myself!

themaria
Posted on September 12th 2010 at 10:41PM

Fantastic! Great to know this was useful, and congrats on becoming a parent soon!

- Maria

Posted on September 8th 2010 at 11:51PM

Great list!  As you said, finding someone who fits the bill will be difficult but they are out there.  Especially if you're willing to nurture the right person who many not have years of experience....who does.  There's a ton of young talent out there and your local colleges and universities can be a tremendous resource.  Get to know your local professors and they can become great team members and valuable assets.  That's what we do.

Brett Relander

Tactical Marketing Labs

Debi Davis
Posted on September 10th 2010 at 9:23PM

I disagree that the "young talent" from "your local colleges and universities" is where you want to go looking for your social media manager; particularly if you want him or her to possess the 12 traits listed here. For example, traits #10 (Strategic) and #11 (Business Savvy) are critical to this mix, and are only developed over time and through experience. 

There seems to be a misconception that because new media involves technology, college-age people are automatically  qualified to manage it.  The first step in hiring a social media manager, in fact, should be to be aware of this misconception.

Mastering the technology is actually the easy part.  The true talent comes in crafting messages aligned with your business strategy, reaching the right communities and audiences, and balancing all aspects of corporate communications according to the greater vision set by the organization. Knowing how to use social media tools is absolutely necessary; but as a skill set to complement communication expertise, not replace it.

Posted on March 29th 2011 at 3:02AM

This is a great point Debi. Technology is the easy part and keeping up with technology is important as well but to be really successful at SSM I agree with your comment on the 'true talent' required.

The true talent comes in crafting messages aligned with your business strategy, reaching the right communities and audiences, and balancing all aspects of corporate communications according to the greater vision set by the organization. Knowing how to use social media tools is absolutely necessary; but as a skill set to complement communication expertise, not replace it.
Posted on September 14th 2010 at 12:49PM

Thanks for the advice.  I'm actually looking for a job as a social media manager, and it's good to have a checklist to measure myself against!

Posted on March 14th 2011 at 10:46PM

I think another consideration would be a general knowledge of search engine optimization as it pertains to social media. Many marketers involved with social media do not realize that they are somewhat in control of many aspects of the company website.

Steven Brown

 

Posted on March 31st 2011 at 10:42PM

Great post Maria. I think that each of your points are well thought out and right on the money. I'll have to check out your post on the differences between social media management and community management because I do both. Looking forward to reading more of your articles.

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