4 Reasons to Stick with Facebook

Hannah Forbes-George
Hannah Forbes-George Director, Capture Communications

Posted on April 29th 2014

4 Reasons to Stick with Facebook

ImageWith Facebook’s organic page reach plummeting (so that just a measly 1-2% of your page fans will actually see your posts in their news feeds – ouchie!) in order to get us spending on advertising, the top social media questions on businesses lips are: Should we still be investing in our Facebook page? Should we even bother having a page anymore? The answer is yes! But be careful . . .

Here are my 4 essential reasons to still invest time in your Facebook page:

You’ve worked so hard

You’ve worked so hard for years to establish a community that you engage with regularly – asking them questions, gathering opinion and having conversations. Why would you just turn that off? That’s priceless. You wouldn’t just throw your customer email database out the window, would you? Turning off your Facebook page would be a worse crime than this, as your fans have actively chosen to interact with you on a personal, two-way level – a marketer’s dream! That doesn’t happen often.

Customer expectation

Your customers and potential customers expect you to be on Facebook full stop; whether they see your updates or not. When they search for your business, they’ll expect you to be there and expect you to be offering value to them in one way or another. Without this, you could run the risk of damaging your brand image. I mean, what sort of businesses don’t have a Facebook presence? – Is what they’ll think.

What about existing fans?

How valued are your fans going to feel if you turn off your page all of a sudden or if you stop interacting with them altogether? Your existing fans matter (a lot), so surely it’s still worth spending the time connecting with them, even if you have to pay to do it effectively. Bringing me nicely onto my next point . . .

Facebook advertising is affordable

When you compare Facebook advertising to other forms of advertising such as print, radio, TV etc. it presents real value for money. Not only this, but Facebook gives you the rare opportunity to be extremely targeted with your advertising.

So even though it seems really unfair that you’re now being forced to pay to connect with your community that you’ve spent years nurturing, we need to remember that it isn’t extortionate and you can run successful campaigns even on minimal budgets.

For example, you can set maximum daily expenditure budgets from as little as £1. At the end of the day Facebook is a business and they have every right to charge for this service – it was just sneaky! We should have seen it coming hey?

So, getting to the point . . .

You simply have to continue with your Facebook efforts (to a certain extent) for all of the reasons mentioned above, and you certainly can’t shut your page down. So what do you do?

It’s all about time management: My advice would be to think very carefully about how much time you’re investing in it, as it's becoming harder and harder to justify. Definitely consider increasing the amount of time you spend on Twitter, Google+ or Pinterest for example as opposed to Facebook, seeing as these channels are becoming more and more attractive to the masses in 2014, particularly Twitter with it’s imminent profile changes that look scarily similar to Facebook.

Hannah Forbes-George

Hannah Forbes-George

Director, Capture Communications

Hannah, is a digital communications and social media marketing specialist who works with solopreneurs and small businesses to help them develop the online side of their businesses and digital marketing skills to become more profitable and digitally savvy.

Hannah has eight years marketing and digital communications experience working across the private and non-profit sectors, including working for one of the top digital B2B agencies in theUK, and is now Director of www.capturecommunications.co.uk. You can also follow her on Twitter @Capture_Comms

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Comments

Really very interesting post on using Facebook.   We should follow your advice about how much time we are inverting on Facebook .   Thanks for sharing 4 essential point .

Hi Ajay, thanks so much for you comment. I'm glad you've found it useful.

I think you hit the nail on the head with #2. Customers who do not work in marketing or have their finger on the pulse of the social landscape have no idea that Page reach has decreased or that marketers who used to see results organically are now required to pay to play. All they know is that essentially every business of every kind is using Facebook now, and they should seek out their favorite ones to access coupons, deals, and other exclusive content. Failing to maintain a presence on the biggest social network on the planet would be a mistake at this point. What I wonder is whether this will mean that in a handful of years, marketers will be maintaining Facebook Pages simply to be there, and duplicating content from other more engaged channels, similiarly to the way many of us handle Google+ now...

Hi Natalie, you make a really good point. My answer would be that 'it will depend'. By which I mean, if your target market is predominantly Facebook based, investing in promoted posts etc. is going to be 100% worthwhile. So brands in the B2C space will still want to be sharing their top content here and getting the engagement they crave - simply because this is where their target market resides.

Having said this, in a handful of years, the balance may have changed. For example, Twittier is currently undertaking  some huge visual changes in order to appeal to the masses - it's becoming very much like Facebook (sorry if I'm rambling on about something you're already very aware of!) in terms of appearance and user experience and likewise with G+. If this is the case, and the same target markets shift their focus onto these networks as opposed to FB, then yes, I think you'd definitely see a decline in the quality and investment that brands would invest into Facebook. 

If your target market has a dominant presence on other networks. I also think you're correct - focus will shift to these other networks and Facebook will just 'exist'. 

Thanks for your comment :-)

Hannah,

I recently came across this video that has some compelling reasons NOT to advertise on FB. It's 9 minutes (long) but worth it. Please let me know what you think? By know means will we be leaving FB nor do we want to advertise (doesn't fit our B2B model), but it is something we have considered for clients.

Any thoughts on which Social Media Platform produces the best results or returns from advertising? I realize that I asked a general questions but am wondering about any feedback on LinkedIn and Twitter? Also, any thoughts on Google Ads. Our Company creates (mainly visual) and manages (social media) content for food and beverage businesses. Most of our creative content is short, documentary-style,online videos (stories, video blogs, product videos, web-series, commercials, etc.). We're in the process now of changing our website from B2C site to a B2B site.

Thanks,
Debbie

Hi Debbie,

Thanks for the comment. Let me take a look at the video and get back to you. Thanks, Hannah