5 Critical Content Marketing Mistakes That You Must Avoid

k.singh
Kay Singh Director (E-Commerce), Noble Infosys

Posted on November 24th 2012

5 Critical Content Marketing Mistakes That You Must Avoid

Content marketing i.e. creating and distributing content is one of the most effective ways to promote a business online. Businesses and marketers all over the world are using content to attract new customers. However, creating quality content regularly, takes valuable time and resources. It is thus important to do it correctly and get the most out of your efforts.

Content Marketing Mistakes

 

In this article we take a look at five common content marketing mistakes that should not be left unchecked. If you want your business to benefit from content marketing, you will need to avoid these mistakes.

1. Writing For The Wrong Audience

When I first started blogging a few years ago, my content was aimed more at marketers, designers and SEO specialists as opposed to businesses. Although my content performed well and I was building a good following, I finally came to a realisation that I was not targeting the right audience.

One of the main purposes of starting a blog for me was to generate leads and sales from my Web design and Internet marketing business. It thus made sense to target businesses instead of other professionals in my niche. Finally, I had to shift focus to address businesses instead of other designers and marketers. I still write about the same topics, but I use less jargon and have had to adjust my tone to address businesses instead. It took me two years to realise this. You can learn from my experience and define your audience right from the start.

2. Poorly Crafted Headlines

Compelling headlines or titles are vital to the success of your content whether it is a blog post, an eBook or a report. Compelling headlines play a major role in determining the popularity and readership of your content.

Content Marketing Mistakes- Poor Headline

A great headline should:

  • Grab the attention of Readers
  • Generate interest and compel users to read the rest of your content
  • Should be clear and concise and easy to understand
  • Should include keywords

You can take advantage of list posts or instructional content as they are very popular among readers and tend to be share more on social media.

Lets take a simple example.  The same headline “methods to improve the usability of your website can be better written as “10 Easy Ways to Improve The Usability of Your Website” which is more compelling and will grab the attention of readers.

3. Focusing On Quantity Over Quality

It is often suggested that a business or web master should publish content every day in order to get more coverage and reach. Publishing daily does have its benefits, particular on blogs. It can improve your search engine rank and drive more visitors towards your website. However it should never be at the cost of quality. Publishing quality content once a week can be equally effective for meeting your marketing objectives.

4. Not Optimising Your Content  Search Engine Optimisation

Optimising your content properly is essential to get the desired results. Both, external SEO factors such as link building and on-page optimisation are important. The importance of good on-page optimisation should not be under-estimated. Good optimisation is a must for all content produced as part of your marketing efforts. It should not be overlooked whether you are creating a blog post, press release or an article.

Content Marketing Mistake - No SEO

Source: SEOMoz. Org

Here are some SEO tips you can use:

  • Choose the right keywords:
  • Use Keywords in Headline
  • Use Keywords in Meta title and description
  • Use keywords in headings and bold text
  • Optimise Image ALT descriptions
  • Use in URL e.g. www.yoursitename.com/keywordphrase.html

5. Syndicating The Same Content Everywhere

It is common for businesses and marketers to distribute content on several sources in order to maximise their reach. For example, a business may post content on its blog, publish articles on article sites, create eBooks and as well as publish documents on document sharing sites. Some businesses make the mistake of publishing the same identical content on several sources.  Although targeting multiple channels can be very effective, syndicating the exact same content everywhere should be avoided.

k.singh

Kay Singh

Director (E-Commerce), Noble Infosys

K.Singh is an E-Commerce Consultant from London with over 12 years of experience consulting and training  with prestigious businesses. He is the Director of Noble Infosys, the London based New Media Agency & the Editor of the Internet Marketing Blog.

He is also the founder of SmallBusinessEcommerce.co,uk, a service that offers Professional Websites for £49

See Full Profile >

Comments

Hi Kay,

This is a great post. You hit the nail on the head there when it comes to content frequency. However, how do you go about chosing a topic? Do you look at a list of long tail keywords and then write a blog post about it?

Peter,

As far as choosing topics go, I mainly get inspiration from other blogs in my niche which I regularly follow. And like most others I rely heavily on Google Reader to keep up to date. I maintain a simple notepad file on my desktop where I maintain a draft list of article topics. These are just some thoughts that come to my mind here and there. I know this is not the most professional approach but so far it has worked for me. Some time across I also came across a free service called contently. It is great for maintaining and expanding upon your topic list.

Hi, Very useful content for optimizing web content and blogs. For me it is very essential learning.

 

Dear Manoj,

I am pleased to know you like the post.

Hi Kay, thanks for the blog post but too general. I can get the same content anywhere on internet.

Dear Kent,

Thank you for your comment. Your constructive advice about the generality of the post is taken on board. You are right, as far as this post goes, I am guilty of covering the same topic that has been covered elsewhere. As a general process, I try to alternate between unique topics and my spin on topics covered elsewhere. In the long term, I would like to focus more on 100% unique ideas but I am sure you know the difficulties faced with that.

Kay,

It’s a little generic…but still mentions some “musts” in the SEO Tips. I also like the Google Ranking Algorithm.

The content marketing life-cycle is a good start. There are only a few enterprise content marketing solutions that are able to encompass the entire life-cycle. Most solutions require you to go in and out of them without having an “all in one” capability.

Identify topics could be identified as the ability to facilitate Goals.  Create content could be under Planning. This can be done with an editorial calendar that helps different departments/teams organize their broadcasts/content distribution. Once the content has been created/organized, it needs to be optimized…so in essence, published to a limitless number of social media channels or custom blogs with a single click.  Promoting can fall under engagement. Ultimately, companies promote by engaging with those who comment/like/share etc. with their content. Lastly, measure and refine is a given. There needs to be a tool that can measure your ROI by tracking the CMLC from beginning to end…showing the valued added from CM over time.

Michael,

Thank you for your valuable insight. I agree with your comment of approaching content marketing strategically from start to finish, and the importance of an editorial calendar and a great tool that allows us to manage the lifecycle from planning, creation through to distribution on various channels. Up until now I have been using notepad and word documents to manage my process in a very ad-hoc manner but I know this is inefficient. Of late, I have started experimenting with tools such as Contently which I find very promising. It does not handle distribution all that well but its a free tool so one can't complain.