6 Best Practices for Great Video Content

Kevin Jorgensen
Kevin Jorgensen Partner, Innovative Marketing Resources

Posted on April 9th 2012

6 Best Practices for Great Video Content

Adding video content to your inbound marketing in the form of testimonials, training videos, video blogs or product demonstrations
 can be extremely valuable. With the advent of YouTube, expectations for Hollywood-quality video have lessened dramatically but getting the basics right differentiates your work from the grainy, unintelligible video content often shot on a cell phone and posted directly to a blog or website. Starting with quality video content saves a lot of production time and hassle since poor quality video or audio sticks out like a sore thumb. Here are 6 simple best practices to help your web videos look professional, whether you are using a Sony HVR-Z7U or an iPhone cam. Even Steven Spielberg does point and shoot! You can too!

  • Steady as She Goes.  Have you seen The Blair Witch Project? If it wasn’t scary, it’d give you vertigo for sure. No one appreciates a shaky vidsaves a lot of production time and hassle since poor quality video or audio sticks out like a sore thumb. Here are 6 simple best practices to help your web videos look professional, whether you are using a Sony HVR-Z7U or an iPhone cam. Even Steven Spielberg does point and shoot! You can too!eo, and it doesn’t take much for a little nudge to create a localized seismic event on today’s phone cams. Using a tripod helps you smoothly pan across a shot. You can pick a decent tripod for about $35. If you have to improvise, try leaning against something to steady yourself or using a stool, ladder or table.
  • Composition.  Asymmetrical shots – those with the subject off-center - look better. Use the artists’ rule of thirds: Imagine a tic-tac-toe pattern across your lens. When filming a person, you want the subject’s eyes lined up with the top line of the tic-tac-toe pattern and then off to either side.  You should shoot closer to your subject for the web; think about people watching your video on a phone or tablet.
  • Lighting.  Use natural light when you can by shooting outdoors in the morning or early afternoon. When shooting video indoors, set up your subject near a window. Try to stay away from fluorescent lighting – it gives a greenish cast to your video. Use white light and experiment with multiple sources from different angles. Some light shadow is good as it gives a sense of depth. Avoid backlighting unless you want your subject to look like a person in the witness protection program.
  • Sound. Get close to your subject when using the internal microphone on a camera. Try picking up a clip-on microphone to help isolate the sound source to just your subject. Be aware of the noises around you; air conditioning/heating, trains, airplanes, lawn mowers, chatting co-workers or even a refrigerator whir can ruin your audio.
  • Zoom. Zoom. It’s fun to zoom in! But zooming degrades the pixel quality of your video and too much zooming can give viewers that vertigo effect. If you must zoom, “Zoom with your feet” and you will match a close up with audio volume and focus that complements the shot.
  • Avoid using special effects while shooting. Once you add an effect while shooting, you can’t take it away. Instead, add effects when you are editing and have more control over them. 

Video content can really enhance the attractive power of your inbound marketing. These best practices can make a huge difference when you are creating video content, especially if you only have one chance to get your footage. After you've got a great video, don't forget to optimize your video SEO so that YouTube and Google will find it when someone searches for video on your subject. Don’t forget spare batteries and memory. Lights, camera, action! What tips can you offer to creating better video content? Need some content ideas? Look here.

 

Kevin Jorgensen

Kevin Jorgensen

Partner, Innovative Marketing Resources

Started my career as an engineer because I enjoy mastering the way things work but quickly learned that people are much more challenging and interesting than machines. Marketing seemed the perfect sandbox. Since the early 90s, pursued the marketing craft in high tech, non-profits and consumer services as a serial entrepreneur who is fascinated by the art and process of communicating the essence and value of ideas in ways that inspire action. Inbound marketing and social media, for all the obvious reasons, have become a passion and something I write about as often as I can but always in the ah-ha moment when the light comes on. Today you can find me at my inbound marketing agency, Innovative Marketing Resources. www.imrcorp.com
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Comments

courvo
Posted on April 13th 2012 at 3:35AM

Nice article, Kevin... your summary mirrors the thoughts I layed-out a couple of years ago here:

http://www.oncamtips.com

Best to you!

Dave Courvoisier
KLAS-TV News Anchor
Las Vegas, NV
http://courvo.com