Facebook can be a recruiters best friend

sandeemiller
Sandy Miller Account Executive, Success Communications

Posted on December 14th 2010

Recruiting has never been an easy job. You really have to be able to pick up cues from candidates to determine how they will fit if you hire them for your organization.

To do that well it takes skill, time and even some luck. I know there were recruiters that just wished, especially when they were undecided on a candidate if they could just be a fly on the wall to see them in the real world to determine if they would be a good hire.

If you wish hard enough sometimes they come true. Right now all recruiters have two powerful ways to be the proverbial fly and get a behind the scenes look at candidates. The first is Google. Just by putting in someone’s name you can find a wealth of information that you would never find on a resume or even through an interview.

The second is of course Facebook. Where else can you go to see information directly from the candidate on their likes, dislikes and really get to know them on a personal level.

But like all good things there can be a dark side. Many recruiters worry that by seeing this information they will learn damaging information. This will cause them to reject candidates and that can open them up to potential lawsuits.

It’s a hard case for a candidate to make against an organization that they weren’t hired because of information that they themselves published on an open site. It’s also difficult to prove that a recruiter went to your Facebook page and that what they saw there was the specific reason you didn’t get the job.

If you are going for a job that requires drug tests and background checks, than is checking a person’s Facebook page really any more intrusive. When you ask for background and drug testing the companies make it known usually even before you come for an interview so you do have the chance to opt out.

If companies make their policies clear to ALL candidate than it becomes their responsibility to understand the implications and take a look at themselves to know if they need to be concerned.

What do you think? Should checking Facebook be standard for recruiters?

You can follow me at www.twitter.com/sandeemiller.

 

sandeemiller

Sandy Miller

Account Executive, Success Communications

Sandy Miller works in marketing,communications and social media. Which means she is used to crazy projects, tight deadlines and working with some of the most creative and frustrating people (you know who your are) in the world. She is constantly looking for new ideas and how they can be adapted to help her clients. Or at least find a way to laugh at what life delivers. Contact me at mc.sandymiller@gmail.com or follow me @sandeemiller and www.marketingdaze.com.
See Full Profile >

Comments

If you are an employer, you are foolish not to check. If you are in the job market, you are foolish to behave as if employers are not checking. It is GOOD news that companies are going to Google you. If you can anticipate what someone is going to do, then you can be prepared. Those that are not prepared in a tight labor market like this are not in touch with the times.

We see this differently: Facebook is a tool for Social Networking and Friending, and forming relationships with companies you admire, and Recruiters you'd like to stay in contact with - NOT spying and making 'judgement' behind peoples backs. We think, if you can't be YOU and hired by a company - your not looking at the right company. Facebook is moving into business networking at an alarming rate, and like it or not, things that you would not want your mother too see shouldn't be posted online anyway - that's just not VERY bright.

Most Companies have Fan Pages: Top Ad Agencies, Business etc. (LIKE)-ing those targets in your job search, is a 'very savvy' move for job hunters: interacting with your 'target companies' on these fan pages is even smarter. 

Just thought I'd offer our perspective on this, keep in mind we are typically called for Senior Executives in the Ad Industry and so perhaps our FB friends are simply more savvy - making it a non issue.

Christie

Thanks!

I guess if recruiters are using Facebook to check out a candidate that's a part of their due diligence. It's also the candidate's responsibility not to broadcast things that they wouldn't want the whole world to know about. My personal rule is that I don't post anything on FB I wouldn't want my mother to know about. That's the line in the sand I've drawn. So far, it's worked just fine.

I think that the main thing recruiters would find from a person's Facebook page is whether or not that person is net-savvy enough to set their privacy controls. If they're not, and if the FB page isn't a squeaky-clean version of their LinkedIn profile, the candidate might be considered naive at best.

I agree that if you are going to use social tools you need to understand what you are using and how to protect yourself. That goes for recruiters or other people that might try to use your info against you.

 

Thanks!

Sandy

I agree that if you are going to use social tools you need to understand what you are using and how to protect yourself. That goes for recruiters or other people that might try to use your info against you.

 

Thanks!

Sandy

I agree that if you are going to use social tools you need to understand what you are using and how to protect yourself. That goes for recruiters or other people that might try to use your info against you.

 

Thanks!

Sandy

I kind of agree with Maria here. Realisitically if someone has potentially damaging things (in terms of applying for a job - such as pics of them otu frunk and the like) then they should know how activate privacy controls (I really don't think this is as hard as everyone makes out on Facebook) or conversly it may mean that the person doesn't view potentially damaging behaviour in the way the company does.  Both good points for a recruiter to find out I think.  Although work and personal life should be completely separate, if someone doesn't recognize this by controlling their social profile from potential employers (and further down the line clients of that employer), maybe they don't know how to keep the two separate appropriately...