Facebook’s EdgeRank Changes and How It Affects You

Samuel Junghenn
Samuel Junghenn Managing Director, Think Big Online

Posted on October 23rd 2012

Facebook’s EdgeRank Changes and How It Affects You

Facebook has made a tweak to its EdgeRank formula which now places posts from pages into feeds which have high engagement.  Previously it placed posts from any Page the user liked, but now it gives priority to Posts form Pages that have high engagement.

In plain English basically if a post has lots likes and comments it will be shown more than posts that don’t have lots of likes and comments.  This is a logical move by Facebook as they try to show to their users more relevant and engaging content in an effort to keep them on the platform longer.

But it’s not being seen like this by Small Businesses who see it as a way for Facebook to give brands more incentive to spend on the Promoted Posts advertising feature.  In general a Promoted Post will achieve more engagement as its shown to more users so the side effect of a promoted post is that it will now also go more viral.

Unfortunately this means smaller businesses with lower budgets will suffer, as they won’t be able to afford the investment needed to promote posts and have them compete with larger brands.

Now this is all very speculative because it’s yet to be proven that this is how it will actually function.  The intention of the change from Facebook was to reward Pages which are posting quality, engaging content by giving them higher rankings in users feeds, which is a positive thing.

In my opinion this will force Page Owners to really engage with their users, post higher quality content and improve the value they are giving to users.  All which are great things for Facebook and the users of Facebook.  While a few companies will take advantage of the change and use promoted posts to make their updates viral it should only be a few companies.

The major outcome from the change is positive for users, an incentive for Page owners to do the right thing and a strong foundation for the future of Facebook.

Samuel Junghenn

Samuel Junghenn

Managing Director, Think Big Online

Serial Entrepreneur that LOVES helping grow medium sized business through the use of cutting edge online marketing techniques

See Full Profile >

Comments

Sammy Mac
Posted on October 23rd 2012 at 12:32PM

What about alert posts from pages that get low engagement? I work at a large college and we post pertinent traffic info, closings, cancellations and so on, that get very few comments or likes because they are not meant to engage but rather inform. Our students have responded well to alerts via FB so that is why we use FB as a channel for that kind of info.

 

CoffyGroup
Posted on October 23rd 2012 at 3:05PM

I wonder if the number of views for posts (i.e. clicking the "See more...") would have an impact? I mean, people sometimes - actually more often than not, tend to read posted/shared contents but doesn't necessarily comment or hit the "Like" button.

Obijuan
Posted on October 23rd 2012 at 10:56PM

I've noticed some brand pages have resorted to asking their fans to change their settings. The idea is to add the page to the fan's interest list (located next to the like button on the brand page).


Is there any indication that this would actually result in a company's content appearing in a timeline more frequently or is this speculative?

 

AmyFowler
Posted on October 24th 2012 at 3:51PM

Isn't this precisely how EdgeRank always worked?

Either way - whether this is a concern for small businesses surely falls down to how exactly Facebook will measure engagement.

Surely the only fair way to measure engagement is as a percentage of the number of likes on the page? So if a page has 50 likes, and 10 people engage with a post, then that's 20% engagement which is great and should get a post seen.

However, if it's based on numbers of likes, shares, and comments, then these generally come in accordance with the number of people who like the page, and that's then completely unfair on small brands.....