How to Resolve a Customer’s Problem Efficiently

alexhisaka
Alex Hisaka Content Marketing Manager, LinkedIn.com

Posted on April 17th 2012

When you resolve a customer’s problem in a timely fashion, you’ll eliminate risk and learn how to help the rest of your customers. It’s important to assess all of the ways your customers are interacting with your business, so you can be confident that every customer service issue is fully tracked any no case will fall through the cracks. Here are a 7 tips for resolving a customer’s problem:Provide the highest level of support: Build a process in the organization to actively monitor your customers. One of the ways you do that is by involving everyone at your company in customer support. Company and team-wide collaboration improves the speed and quality of responses to the customer and lowers the cost of service.

Help customers help themselves: A growing number of companies are creating online help centers, or other ways for customers to interact. This not only improves customer satisfaction, but also saves time and resources for your business.

Solve the problem before it occurs: Focus on finding ways to enhance performance and ensure the reliability of your product or service so you can provide the highest level of customer service. Have processes and systems in place to eliminate risk and the number of customer service issues.

Communicate with customers: Be truthful and transparent, even when it’s difficult or inconvenient. When you maintain an open dialogue with your customers and keep them informed at all times, you’ll earn your customer’s trust and commitment to your company.

Know the customer: Customer feedback is essential to understanding your customers and improving your products and services. Instead of relying on assumptions, you need to ask your customers what's working and what's not. You’ll get an opportunity to strengthen your most valuable relationships and learn how to help the rest of your customers.

When you do wrong, make it right: When something goes awry, analyze the root cause of the problem and prevent that from happening again. Confront hard issues in a timely fashion, admit what you don’t know and get the answers before the problem occurs. Act with integrity and be accountable for your product, and if you promise on something, deliver on it.

Reward the customer: Money is not always the best remedy. Customers who are not buying on price are looking for a thoughtful approach to customer service. So when a problem happens, listen to the customer with respect and attention and apologize. It gives the customers the chance to connect emotionally with your business. If you want to take it a step further, reward the customer by developing specific campaigns so you can retain the most valuable ones.

Your first responsibility should always be towards your customers. When your business is focused on understanding the needs of your customers, it can lead to insights that have an impact on all of your customers. And most importantly, it builds trust. Whether you resolve a customer service issue or not, your customers will see that you have their best interest in mind -- and that’s more valuable than anything. 



Alex Hisaka works in marketing at Desk.com. You can find her on Twitter at twitter.com/alexhisaka

Comments

I love the idea of helping customers help themselves in a forum sort of format. It empowers people. You just have to monitor for trolls. 

Yes, trolls can be a bit of a problem. Or the spam bots. As long as you keep a close eye though it generally works really well!

~Tammy