Invasion of the Selfies

katieparr
Katie Parr Digital Marketing Specialist, Washington Pavilion

Posted on April 26th 2014

Invasion of the Selfies

Let me take a selfie.

If selfies were zombies then by golly, we have been overtaken.

From the photo versions on social media feeds to songs about selfies on the radio, personal close-ups are just the latest viral outbreak in the social media realm.

While taking a photo of oneself is not a new concept, the term "selfie" (and the increasing narcisism that goes along with it) is a newfangled creation. So is the claim that a rise in selfies is now resulting in an increased desire for plastic surgery.

Take Triana Lavey, for instance. Over the last week, the California woman has been featured by several news outlets for going through with $15,000 of plastic surgery in order to make her selfies look better.

"Your social media presence is just as important as your real-life presence," Lavey told ABC news. "Your selfie is your head shot so you can reinvent yourself every day with your iPhone. It’s a legitimate form of promoting yourself.”

Yikes.    

The prevalence of selfies is honestly sickening. People of all ages have fallen victim, from toddlers to senior citizens. For some, selfies are harmless fun and games but to others, the fad is literally morphing into something greater: a hunger for Internet fame, a cry for attention and in some cases, an addiction. The desire for "the perfect selfie" has even contributed to a suicide attempt by 19-year-old Danny Bowman, Britain's first-known selfie addict.

Selfies don't always have a drastic outcome but they can affect your quality of life in small ways. Imagine yourself in the last place you took a selfie. Were you with your friends at a concert? Were you alone at the park? Were you by the railroad tracks in Peru? No matter where you were, you probably missed something during your photo-taking spree, like the moment when the band's lead singer pointed right at you or the rare bird that made an appearance in a nearby bush or the train conductor's foot colliding against your head. You're missing those little things as you stare at the one thing you probably know the best: your face in a four-inch screen.

Is the human race so far gone that the only thing we're capable of is promoting narcisism? Where is the creative content on our newsfeeds? Will we ever be able to truly grasp the meaning of privacy or will we continue to live in our celebrity-driven, photoshopped worlds?  

Wait, don't answer that just yet...let me take a selfie. 

katieparr

Katie Parr

Digital Marketing Specialist, Washington Pavilion

When Katie Parr isn't writing young adult novels, doing kickboxing, and watching cat videos, she's cramming her brain with online marketing strategies and dreaming up creative content. Katie currently serves as the Digital Marketing Specialist for the Washington Pavilion, a center for the performing arts, visual arts and sciences in Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

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Comments

Jua114Adams
Posted on April 27th 2014 at 12:49AM

I just can't believe how many people are taking selfies!  My social media sites are full of them!  I can't stand getting my picture taken, let alone standing in front of my phone taking photo after photo just to get that ONE picture to post to Facebook!  

James Meyer
Posted on April 27th 2014 at 6:45PM

I think the value proposition here is how can a business capitalize on the whole "selfie" trend?  I personally think they are silly BUT... I've started recommending to my business clients they devise some type of "selfie zone" or "selfie opportunity" in their facility or business.  Designate a fun spot... with the brand or logo as the backdrop, maybe a phone number or URL... a sort of "selfie spot".

Every business owner or brand manager I recommend this concept to looks at me dumbfounded.  Hey... if you can't beat 'em... let 'em share your brand for you!

Thoughts?

katieparr
Posted on April 28th 2014 at 9:56AM

Hi James! Thanks for the comment. :) You're absolutely right; selfies can be used effectively in a business promotional setting. I think it's really been working for many companies, especially clothing companies or those offering a specific product.