Social Enterprise: Realigning With Disruptive Technology

Localspeak
Candida McCollam Owner/Partner, Localspeak

Posted on May 3rd 2014

Social Enterprise: Realigning With Disruptive Technology

ImageAs the demand for integrating social media intelligence into the ecosystem of companies grows, across almost all verticals, human data has become the new currency.  Enterprise command centers have already proven this and remain popular. Additionally, we’re also seeing an increase in a proliferation of NLP dashboards and leaderboards move from the back room, onto employee desktops and into hallways and atriums, partly in response to more companies recognizing the inherent values of migrating to a social enterprise. 

Consequently, not only have more companies seen the correlation between growing brand loyalty through employee advocacy programs, but significantly, also see high returns on the value of adopting new social intelligence collaboration tools. 

Suddenly, the erstwhile dark underbelly of what may once have been viewed as negative “disruptive technology” is seeing new light as “productive technology”—breaking through airtight corporate silos by promoting social collaboration throughout the organization.  

A new report by The Altimeter Group, Digital Transformation: Why and How Companies are Investing in New Business Models to Lead Digital Customer Experiences underscores why companies are realigning and investing in disruptive technology to engage in new ways in the customer experience life cycle.

One of the new disruptive technologies I’ve recently come across is Live Pulse™ from NetBase, a live mobile device-compatible dashboard product, also deployable as a leader board.  Notably, the product aligns with enterprise trends to socially enable brands through employee empowerment by moving analytics from the back room to employee desktops and beyond.  Combined with a holistic social media strategy and leadership, enterprise shared analytics equips brand product teams throughout the organization to collaborate creatively and compete intelligently.

Among the cross-vertical implications offered by the Live Pulse suite and others tools, I see these potential use cases, among others: 

  • Global Marketing: To run a play-by-play analysis of a global marketing campaign you’ve just rolled out for analysis of comparative consumer reaction by market.  
  • Crisis detection: To track customer issues if you’re an auto industry product manager in charge of crisis detection and mitigation.
  • Ad Concept Testing: To test images if you’re an agency conducting unbranded ad or concept testing.
  • Nonprofit or NGO Listening: To monitor potential global hotspots and identify influencers with whom to engage. 
  • Fast Food Competitive Analysis: To track competitive new offerings, such as the fast food brekkie wars, state-by-state by emerging topics and sentiment.
  • Entertainment:  To test and track global theatrical pre-release trailers in-country.
  • Portfolio Manager:  To track and analyze conversations for the competitive products in your pharmaceutical portfolio.
  • Government Regulation:  To track emerging consumer topics if you’re a consumer protection or regulatory agency.
  • Politics:  To monitor public issues by city, state or region, whether you’re an incumbent or political hopeful.
  • Innovation:  To analyze emerging trends if you’re a brand innovator conducting data mining.

 

I spoke with NetBase CMO Pernille Bruun-Jensen about the implications of social employee advocacy programs to companies offered by the Live Pulse suite.  As Chris Boudreaux and Sue Emerick explain in their book The Most Powerful Brand on Earth, companies who claim to be omni-channel simply cannot ignore their employees as a channel.  Bruun-Jensen agreed that running Live Pulse on as many screens as possible throughout a company—where its social integration and performance metrics are continually updating at the granular level—helps to empower employee brand advocates.

Emphasizing the need for disruptive technology and tools that deepen organizational collaboration and, thereby, elevate customer experience and brand loyalty, Bruun-Jensen said: 

“What this suddenly means for us, and I’m definitely on a mission to do this, is that we help businesses, marketing, PR people, digital marketers, and community managers collaborate better inside their companies and around their customers in order to create a better customer experience.  This is accomplished by seeing data in a new way that drives the right conversation, and drives it in the moment when they still have a chance to actually create a better experience for their customer and for their brand.”

“By bringing data to the forefront in a new way using executive Live Pulses, we’re seeing people talking.  We’re suddenly seeing functions that never set foot in the analytics area.  The CEO is turning up and wanting to see what’s going on. It’s a better way to consume it.  Of course, you have to have great people who can go deeper, not simply identify hot topics. I see Pulses as an immense collaborator for the entire enterprise, changing the way we work.”

 

Localspeak

Candida McCollam

Owner/Partner, Localspeak

Global social media analyst, research strategist and localization expert. Delivers global social media brand audits, analytics, brand innovation, media tracking. NetBase partner, leverages award-winning NLP platform Insight Composer to deliver global brand insights and analytics in 40 languages. Yogini, linguaphile, passionate about global cultural research, social brand innovation, competitive positioning, social analytics.

 
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