• Russ Fradin
    Russ Fradin on July 29, 2014

    Why Employee Advocacy Matters

    Employee advocacy is an emerging new marketing strategy where companies empower their influential employees to authentically distribute brand approved content, create original content, and in turn earn recognition and rewards for their activity and participation.
  • alexmoffit
    Alex Moffit on September 4, 2014

    John Doerr on OKRs and Goal Setting at Google and Intel [VIDEO]

    “Ideas are precious, but they’re relatively easy. It’s execution that’s everything,” says John Doerr, partner at Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, and the man who introduced Objective & Key Results (OKRs) to Google. Google widely credits OKRs for helping the company grow from 40 to 40,000 employees. Other businesses including LinkedIn and Twitter have also embraced OKRs.
  • Greg Gerik
    Greg Gerik on September 16, 2014

    Shaking Up Social: Attending the Social Shake-Up in Atlanta

    Last year, the Social Shake-Up was one of the best social conferences to attend and this year promises to be even better. Here are a few of the hottest topics and sessions at the Shake-Up this year that are sure to deliver and drive this industry forward.
  • ddarnbrough
    Drew Darnbrough on September 19, 2014

    The Power of Hindsight: Using Historical Twitter Data to Make Better Decisions

    WEBINAR: Tuesday, September 23rd, 11:30am EDT How many times have you looked back and thought, “If only I’d known x”? We’ve all experienced the power of hindsight, and luckily now businesses can harness that power by analyzing historical social data.
  • Day one of the second Social Shake-Up is over! If you weren't one of the 600 attendees in Atlanta, not to worry: we've recapped it here for you, from Brian Solis to fried chicken to the afternoon keynote.

    Day one of the second Social Shake-Up is over! If you weren't one of the 600 attendees in Atlanta, not to worry: we've recapped it here for you.

    The day began, as it did last year, with a conversation between Brian Solis and Robin Carey about the state of social business. Wendy Lea then gathered a panel of CEOs to discuss the challenges and benefits of transitioning into (or starting up) a social business. The morning breakout sessions covered everything from wearables by Ralph Lauren to data privacy tips from one of our top notch bloggers, Tamara Dull. The afternoon breakout sessions featured a knockout panel on how to incorporate social into the shopping experience with representatives from Whole Foods, The Home Depot, and Arby's (causing one tweeter to claim that Natanya Anderson of Whole Foods basically pulled a "#micdrop"). We ended the day with MasterCard debating whether or not marketing and communications departments should merge; a keynote featuring Renee Ducre, Jeff Dachis, and Vanessa DiMauro, with a cameo by SMT Best Thinker Randy Milanovic; and, of course, a cocktail hour.

    Stay tuned for our recap of the second and final day tomorrow, and follow along on Twitter with the hashtag #SocialShakeUp! 
     
    From my keynote address this morning at The Social Shake-Up in Atlanta: How can big companies benefit from crowd-based business models in the Maker Movement, Crowdfunding, and Sharing Economy? We call this the Collaborative Economy, and big companies can participate, too.

    From my keynote address this morning at The Social Shake-Up in Atlanta: What role do corporations play if people get what they need from each other? How can big companies benefit from crowd-based business models in the Maker Movement, Crowdfunding, and Sharing Economy? We call this the Collaborative Economy, an economic model in which creation, ownership, and access are shared between people and corporations. See the SlideShare below to see how it all comes together.

    Bonus: Attendee Mei Lin Fung took detailed notes and posted them for the public. Truly social. Click here to access them!

    Top image via Ludic Creatives

    At the Social Shake-Up, Mike Federle, the COO of Forbes; Carl Lavin, the homepage editor of CNN Digital; and Mary Ellen Egan, the Senior Content Director at Social Media Today, tackled how journalism and publishing are evolving in a panel titled “When Your Customers Become Your Contributors: Brand Journalism Meets Traditional.” To kick off the panel, Simon asked, “In the social age where anyone can publish anything, anywhere, any time, what is a media brand? Is it a platform, is it a publisher?”

    At the Social Shake-Up, Mike Federle, the COO of Forbes; Carl Lavin, the homepage editor of CNN Digital; and Mary Ellen Egan, the Senior Content Director at Social Media Today, tackled how journalism and publishing are evolving in a panel titled “When Your Customers Become Your Contributors: Brand Journalism Meets Traditional.” Simon Pearce of Fabric Branding moderated.

    To kick off the panel, Simon asked, “In the social age where anyone can publish anything, anywhere, any time, what is a media brand? Is it a platform, is it a publisher?”

    Mike noted that Forbes is maintaining their traditional publication while quickly growing their digital platform: “The publishing side remains the front door of the brand, because the Forbes brand is so well known around the world. But the digital is 60-65% on the revenue side.” They are accomplishing this by maintaining and growing a huge contributor network, consisting of “1400 writers who have been vetted by our senior editors, who are each in charge of a particular channel.” Essentially, the editorial happens with the contributor selection, after which contributors can publish directly to the platform with no editorial oversight.

    Mary Ellen spoke to how things have changed for her, as someone who started off as a “traditional” journalist but lived through the shift to digital and blogging. When the shift was first beginning, she noted, “The print people were always like, ‘Oh those digital hacks!’” Meanwhile, the bloggers “thought we were scotch-drinking, cigar-smoking” stereotypes of journalists who produced one paltry article a day. Since those early years, she’s come to realize that “blogs allow us to engage with so many more people. Contributors become commenters themselves,” extending the story beyond the original piece.

    Simon wondered if the constant reality of getting scooped by Twitter and Facebook was making traditional outlets, burdened with fact-checking, start to fear irrelevancy.

    Not at all, Carl stated, noting, “It’s only true if I see it on CNN: [people who say that] are the people who are valuable to us.” Mary Ellen agreed, noting that she found out about Joan Rivers’s death through Twitter but immediately turned to the New York Times for verification, context, and additional information. “As we’ve learned,” she said, “the internet has changed how we consume information, and we have to be more skeptical now."

    The panelists then waded into the murkier waters of brand journalism and whether it’s playing nicely with publishers. Everyone agreed that sponsored content had to be marked as such, whether through clear labeling or obvious font and stylistic differences. “If you step on a line,” said Mary Ellen, “the crowd’s going to let you know.”

    When it comes to brand journalism, “content is content, on the web,” Mike said, “ and marketers have just as much of a right to be talking about it as anyone else,” as long as they're not trying to pull something over on the audience. And there are standards, of course: for instance, if a company wants to put out sponsored content claiming vaccines are deadly or that there's a home-made vaccine replacement that’s safer, that content certainly wouldn’t make it onto CNN. “If it’s not true, and we can prove it’s not true, we won’t accept it,” Carl said simply.

    And the publishers’ own brands aren’t becoming less important as a result of the internet, Mike said. In fact, “the brand becomes more important: the reason we’re able to attract 1400 contributors is because they want to write for a reputable brand that’s going to bring them recognition as well.” 

    Carl envisioned the new structure of publishing as a pyramid: “At the widest point, the base, people can comment on stories [and become a part of the story itself]. But as you go further up, there’s more and more vetting [of contributors] until you get to the very top. Brands can participate at any level – except the very top.”

    “Digital allows everyone to join the conversation,” Carl said. “The publishing part stays true to the old-style values of journalism – clarity, accuracy, urgency and context – but the audience is part of this too. The journalist is no longer preaching to a sleepy congregation.”

    In other words, the congregation itself is waking up and clamoring to be a part of the story, and it’s a crowd that includes brands, companies, and marketers along with regular readers. Publishing is going to have to keep evolving to accommodate it.

    In this video, hear what people are saying about The Social Shake-Up this year.

    The Social Shake-Up started off with a bang at the W-Midtown Atlanta, where leaders of big-picture social and technology have gathered to speak about the rapidly changing way we work. Attendees, from high-level executives to freelance practitioners, rub elbows and learn from panelists on the front lines of social business. In this video, see some of the conversations we've been having about new ways to connect with customers, employees, managers and leaders.

     

    This year’s Social Shake-Up conference in Atlanta is bringing together an impressive breadth of brands, industries and marketing professionals from around the globe. From the world’s most recognizable brands like—Coke, IBM, Facebook, Walmart, UPS, to name just a few—to leading universities like Emory and the University of Rochester, to the world’s top public health research organizations.

    “Different roads sometimes lead to the same castle.” ― George R.R. Martin, A Game of Thrones

    This year’s Social Shake-Up conference in Atlanta is bringing together an impressive breadth of brands, industries and marketing professionals from around the globe. From the world’s most recognizable brands like—Coke, IBM, Facebook, Walmart, UPS, to name just a few—to leading universities like Emory and the University of Rochester, to the world’s top public health research organization—the Center for Disease Control—the conference has brought the best and the brightest to converse and brainstorm about the impact and the future of social marketing. 

    Here’s a profile of the 600+ attendees, starting with attendees by industry.

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    And although the Fortune 500 is well represented, attendees came in large numbers from start-ups and high growth mid-sized companies as well.

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    Reflecting the makeup of our visitors to SocialMediaToday.com, the Social Shake-Up attendees are heavily geared towards decision makers and influencers within their organizations.

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