Recent Posts

Why Android Owns Smartphone Growth

David H Deans
As the worldwide marketplace absorbed more low-cost smartphones for mobile internet access, a new era gained momentum in the Global Networked Economy. The dominant smartphone operating systems (OS), Google Android and Apple iOS, saw their combined market share swell to 96.4 percent for the quarter, leaving little space for competitors. Android was the primary driver with its vendor partners shipping a total of 255.3 million Android-based smartphones in 2Q14 -- that's up by an impressive 33.3 percent year-over-year.
Why Android Owns Smartphone Growth

Mobilizing Your Brand: 5 Tips Mobile Marketers Can't Forget

Lewis Robinson
In February of 2014, more Americans accessed the Internet through mobile smart devices than they did through conventional computers. This is the very first time that this has happened. Up until this year, mobile internet use has always been something of a secondary concern for marketers.
Mobilizing Your Brand: 5 Tips Mobile Marketers Can't Forget

The BlackBerry 10: Can It Reclaim the Business Market?

Deborah Sweeney
With the announcement of BlackBerry 10, many are wondering if the company can, once again, offer businesses something that no other phone can. BlackBerry has always offered a level of security that many businesses felt was worth investing in. Even if the phones were annoying and cumbersome, the fact that BlackBerry encrypted e-mails meant that company secrets were less likely to leak out.
The BlackBerry 10: Can It Reclaim the Business Market?

Mobile Content Revenue to Exceed $1 Billion by 2015

David H Deans
The fast growth of mobile video advertising revenues will mean changes in the revenue mix.
Mobile Content Revenue to Exceed $1 Billion by 2015

Smartphone Apps – Your Brand in Their Pockets

Alex Smith

Three Ways NFC Technology Will Create a Brand New Form of Social Media Engagement

George Guildford
"Near Field Communication technology enables smartphone users to gain instant access to digital data from another NFC enabled handset or NFC tag simply by placing or waving their phone next to the NFC tag. Much like scanning a QR code or connecting via Bluetooth, the tag then sends content automatically between the handset and the tag - be it a Foursquare-style check-in at a record store or access to an exclusive in-store promotion."

Smartphones, Tablets Change How We Use Social

jessicaschilling
What did you do this morning after your alarm went off - other than hit the snooze button? If you've got a smartphone, a new study says, there's about a one-in-three chance that you switched on your phone and loaded up an app. And if you're in that group, chances are also pretty good that you checked Twitter, Facebook or some other social networking app; 18 percent of those users, for example, logged onto Facebook before they got out from under the covers.

Putting Personal Choice into Enterprise IT

mfauscette
Both the bottom up employee grassroots efforts and the new top down CIO policy shift signal a change for IT in a much broader sense. Web 2.0 taught us that software and tech tools can be simple, elegant and mask complexity while increasing productivity and functionality. The IT shop of the future is one that continues to effectively manage risk and security but also empowers employees by enabling personal choice that will increase productivity and satisfaction.