• TheDigitalJen
    Jennifer Stalzer on November 19, 2013

    Tough Lessons to Becoming a Socially Engaged Brand

    About 18 months ago, MasterCard set out on a mission to become the most socially connected and engaged brand in the payments space. As I look back, here's a look at almost ten hard lessons we learned.
  • ChristopherCarfi
    Christopher Carfi on December 9, 2013

    Five Trends That Are Going to Affect Marketing in 2014

    Agile marketing is now a common approach, and includes a healthy loop of building, testing, measuring, learning, refining and improving. There are five trends that you need to be on the lookout for when creating your marketing plans in the coming year, a combination of focus on results and a set of new channels that can connect directly to the bottom line.
  • JeffreyDachis
    Jeffrey Dachis on December 18, 2013

    Real-Time Marketing 101: It All Starts With The Trends

    Imagine you are a marketer in 1951. Harry S. Truman is president and Milton Berle is the most famous person on T.V., raking in 80% of all television viewers every night of the week. It’s the dawn of modern mass marketing. What if you were the first marketer to figure out how to use T.V. to sell stuff? You’d probably be in pretty high demand. The potential to sell your products would be effectively limitless. Well, an innovative, new marketing channel with the potential to rival television for its importance has arrived and marketers are starting to take notice.
  • Act-On Software
    Act-On Software on April 18, 2014

    Six Best Practices for Creating a Content Marketing Strategy

    Content marketing is the linchpin of demand creation –the link between brand awareness and lead generation. Done well, it builds familiarity, affinity and trust with prospective and current customers by providing information that resonates – in the right format, through the right channel, at the right time.
  • IBM Social Business
    IBM Social Business on April 18, 2014

    Patterns in Achieving Social Business Success by Leading and Pioneering Organizations

    Here is an excerpt from “Patterns in Achieving Social Business Success by Leading and Pioneering Organizations,” an exclusive whitepaper brought to you by IBM. This whitepaper provides a step-by-step guide for determining your strategy to achieving social business success.
  • Spredfast
    Spredfast Business on May 1, 2014

    The Social Media Pocket Guide: Six Ways Marketers Should Use Social

    This guide walks through each of the “Big Six” objectives and provides a tactical overview of the business case, team considerations and actual content examples and templates to use for your social media initiatives. 
Download the guide now and use it as a cheat sheet on how to get started today using proven tactics and best practices.
  • Actiance
    Actiance Compliance on May 9, 2014

    The Forrester Wave: Social Risk and Compliance Solutions, Q2 2014

    Forbidding employees to use social networks because they may expose your business to risk is no longer a viable business strategy. According to its new report published today, “The Forrester Wave™: Social Risk And Compliance Solutions, Q2 2014,” Forrester Research, Inc. says “the practice of prohibiting social [is] no longer feasible.”
  • Spredfast
    Spredfast Business on June 9, 2014

    6 Blueprints for Social Network Success

    The Big 6 social networks offer tremendous marketing opportunities - but each one is very different from the next. That’s why Spredfast has assembled the 6 Blueprints for Social Network Success. In this quick-read collection, you’ll discover more than 50 constructive, actionable marketing tips and real-world examples from major brands like Hyatt, British Airways, Target, and General Mills. Let’s start building!
  • Synapsify
    Synapsify, Inc. on June 16, 2014

    Piecing Together the Story: Synapsify’s Annual Voice of Customer Industry Survey and Insight

    This eBook reveals the common practices and challenges faced today by social media managers/directors and brand insight analyst and conducted an online survey of 70 social media and content analysts professionally recruited for this survey. The survey results are presented as part of a complimentary eBook in which insight industry professionals shed light on their challenges and common practices they face in understanding the true voice of their customers.
  • Community management has been around for at least 20 years – ever since the first AOL chat rooms and newspaper forum message boards made their debut in the 1990s. Fan sites and gaming rooms were also early incarnations of online communities. Back then the community manager moderated posts by the thousands on a daily basis. Fast forward two decades, where social media has come into play and the terms ‘community manager’ and ‘social media manager’ are commonplace – and sometimes used interchangeably.

    Community management has been around for at least 20 years – ever since the first AOL chat rooms and newspaper forum message boards made their debut in the 1990s. Fan sites and gaming rooms were also early incarnations of online communities. Back then the community manager moderated posts by the thousands on a daily basis.

    Fast forward two decades, where social media has come into play and the terms ‘community manager’ and ‘social media manager’ are commonplace – and sometimes used interchangeably.

    With the explosive growth of both these positions at organizations big and small, the career path for this profession has extended along with it, as has the importance of social media in an organization.

    As a result, there is a demand for the role of a Chief Community Officer. What is the professional development path for this role, and how does the role strategically benefit an organization?

     

    The career path for community

    The skills required of a community professional are many and varied. A talented community manager will be a skilled writer, a project manager, a brand marketer, provide incredible customer support, be a brand ambassador, and have a knack for event planning, and they also need to be able to lead.

    As they progress in their career their scope and influence grows and they learn to manage communities at scale. The insight these people have into consumer behaviors is invaluable to a company’s leadership and can help inform company strategy and exciting new opportunities.

    LinkedIn has seen the terms ‘online community management’ and “social media manager” grow 44% over the year as skills that people are including in their professional profiles. With no filters added, a quick look on LinkedIn reveals over 9,000 job opportunities for community managers, over 5,000 for Director of Community, and only 500 for Chief Community Officer. Yet a seat at the boardroom table is the next logical step in the career path of an individual who has built a career in community building.

     

    The Value of a Chief Community Officer

    In recent years companies like Starbucks and UBM Tech have hired Chief Community Officers to fill a very interesting and high-profile role. Their responsibilities range from editorial control and strategy, to training, uniting communities around the world, and social responsibility initiatives.

    The Community Roundtable, a membership organization for community professionals, publishes a report each year on the State of Community Management. This year it found that communities are not only maturing rapidly, but the benefits seen from them are impressive, and the level of executive interaction within communities is increasing. In 58% of the communities surveyed, the community managers are coaching executives on how to participate in a community.

    There are benefits to having a Chief Community Officer on staff. The Community Roundtable’s 2014 report states that communities that are “best in class” or mature and operating at scale, all have an approved strategy, and 79% of those strategies are operational and measurable.

    With these kinds of demonstrable results, a Chief Community Officer can create a compelling business case to acquire the resources needed to make a strategy successful, such as tools, a bigger staff, or a fully funded roadmap.

    Community management increasingly needs a full staff to cover all the following areas: social listening, moderation, content creation, SEO, analysis, and more. Social media and community management are not only 24 hours a day and seven days a week, but global as well. When there’s a well-resourced team handling the work, they are almost twice as likely to be able to measure value.

    In the future we’ll see the role of Chief Community Officer become more commonplace in large-scale global brands, agencies, and in start-ups and small businesses. Rest assured, we can expect to see more Chief Community Officers take their seat at the boardroom table as community management grows in influence and delivers measurable results.

    - See more at: http://www.emoderation.com/bringing-community-management-boardroom#sthash.VFeIMY9j.dpuf

    Community management has been around for at least 20 years – ever since the first AOL chat rooms and newspaper forum message boards made their debut in the 1990s. Fan sites and gaming rooms were also early incarnations of online communities. Back then the community manager moderated posts by the thousands on a daily basis.

    Fast forward two decades, where social media has come into play and the terms ‘community manager’ and ‘social media manager’ are commonplace – and sometimes used interchangeably.

    With the explosive growth of both these positions at organizations big and small, the career path for this profession has extended along with it, as has the importance of social media in an organization.

    As a result, there is a demand for the role of a Chief Community Officer. What is the professional development path for this role, and how does the role strategically benefit an organization?

    The career path for community

    The skills required of a community professional are many and varied. A talented community manager will be a skilled writer, a project manager, a brand marketer, provide incredible customer support, be a brand ambassador, and have a knack for event planning, and they also need to be able to lead.

    As they progress in their career their scope and influence grows and they learn to manage communities at scale. The insight these people have into consumer behaviors is invaluable to a company’s leadership and can help inform company strategy and exciting new opportunities.

    LinkedIn has seen the terms ‘online community management’ and “social media manager” grow 44% over the year as skills that people are including in their professional profiles. With no filters added, a quick look on LinkedIn reveals over 9,000 job opportunities for community managers, over 5,000 for Director of Community, and only 500 for Chief Community Officer. Yet a seat at the boardroom table is the next logical step in the career path of an individual who has built a career in community building.

    The Value of a Chief Community Officer

    In recent years companies like Starbucks and UBM Tech have hired Chief Community Officers to fill a very interesting and high-profile role. Their responsibilities range from editorial control and strategy, to training, uniting communities around the world, and social responsibility initiatives.

    The Community Roundtable, a membership organization for community professionals, publishes a report each year on the State of Community Management. This year it found that communities are not only maturing rapidly, but the benefits seen from them are impressive, and the level of executive interaction within communities is increasing. In 58% of the communities surveyed, the community managers are coaching executives on how to participate in a community.

    There are benefits to having a Chief Community Officer on staff. The Community Roundtable’s 2014 report states that communities that are “best in class” or mature and operating at scale, all have an approved strategy, and 79% of those strategies are operational and measurable.

    With these kinds of demonstrable results, a Chief Community Officer can create a compelling business case to acquire the resources needed to make a strategy successful, such as tools, a bigger staff, or a fully funded roadmap.

    Community management increasingly needs a full staff to cover all the following areas: social listening, moderation, content creation, SEO, analysis, and more. Social media and community management are not only 24 hours a day and seven days a week, but global as well. When there’s a well-resourced team handling the work, they are almost twice as likely to be able to measure value.

    In the future we’ll see the role of Chief Community Officer become more commonplace in large-scale global brands, agencies, and in start-ups and small businesses. Rest assured, we can expect to see more Chief Community Officers take their seat at the boardroom table as community management grows in influence and delivers measurable results.

     

    This week I moderated another Social Media Today webinar as part of their Best Thinker webinar series, this time on the topic of Content Marketing: Is 2014 Really Shaping Up to Be The Year of Video? The webinar included a superb mix of panelists namely: Zach Cole the Social Media Manager at Lyft, Richard Boehmcke Creative Director for Vibrant Motion, and Kristen Craft who is the Director of Partnerships at Wistia.

    This week I moderated another Social Media Today webinar as part of their Best Thinker webinar series, this time on the topic of Content Marketing: Is 2014 Really Shaping Up to Be The Year of Video? This webinar was sponsored by Act-On who recently was named by Forrester as a leader in the Marketing Automation space (see act-on.com/wave for more info). The webinar included a superb mix of panelists, including: Zach Cole the Social Media Manager at Lyft, Richard Boehmcke Creative Director for Vibrant Motion, and Kristen Craft who is the Director of Partnerships at Wistia.

    Richard got us rolling with a few slides on video creation strategy which he declared that the Wild Wild West is alive and well in the video creation space. You should “know where you want to go before your start” a video project. This was well re-tweeted by the audience  on Twitter.

    Kristen then took over and showed some slides on the impact of video along with some best practices. She mentioned that length is inversely correlated to the number of completed videos, which brought about a bunch of questions on the optimal length (approx. 2 min) and whether you need to break up longer videos into “chapters” was discussed in the Q&A.  

    Zach gave the final presentation with an overview of his video content marketing strategy at Lyft. He suggested 3 Tiers of video: Tier 1 – High production videos that can showcase your product or services, Tier 2 – Low production, quick turn type of video, more playful and short form, Tier 3 – Long tail content that can either be motion graphic video or talking heads but something that has long life, in his case “What is Lyft?” is a key piece of his video strategy.   

    Now, if you have ever been on a Social Media Today webinar before, you know they are very “participant-driven” and we love to ask your questions of our panelists. Many of the questions from our audience revolved around topics such as: How much production should you put into a video (2 camera angles etc)? Measuring the value of video content marketing strategies? What tools give you the best measurements? What is a realistic expectation for a B2B video to be viewed?

    If that piqued your interest, you will want to hear the replay of this webinar, please check out this link. Otherwise, we hope you will join us on another Social Media Today webinar! The next webinar is on Customer Service is the New Marketing: Turning Satisfaction Into Sales. Sign up for it or view the schedule of upcoming webinars here.

    When you consider that 66.7% of public brand mentions on social media come from Twitter, it’s worth taking the platform seriously. Everything from the design of the headers and logos, to the time and structure of the tweet needs to be on form for your brand to succeed and stand out on the channel; social reputation and the way you interact with your target audience in a target moment is key on such a public platform.
    Social media is a huge part of digital marketing and when you consider that 66.7% of public brand mentions on social media come from Twitter (according to Econsultancy), it’s worth taking the platform seriously. Everything from the design of the headers and logos, to the time and structure of the tweet needs to be on form for your brand to succeed and stand out on the channel; social reputation and the way you interact with your target audience in a target moment is key on such a public platform.
     
    Sometimes, we all hit a brick wall when deciding what to tweet. Sometimes, what you are saying needs a little more strategy and alignment with overall company or sales goals. It's a crowded market place and it can be a battle to get your voice heard amongst the constant stream of chatter, which is why considering the "why's and wherefore's" behind the tweet is so important.
     
    We work as a digital marketing agency across a number of verticals from small clients to multi-national brands, internal projects to worldwide product roll outs and we've spotted some recurring patterns in successful Tweets: those which generated more interactions, more engagement and more return on investment. These eight Twitter ‘formulas’ present a breakdown of the most popular structures of a a post, which will of course depend on the tweet’s purpose and your intended audience. 
     
    8 Tweet structures to generate engagement
     
    Try experimenting with some of them and see which are most successful in getting people to take notice of your tweets and respond to what you have to say!
     
    We don’t have a social media dictionary…yet. Concepts like engagement and measurement mean many things to many people. We do have best practices per se, but even those seem subjective. We hear experts telling us we have to interact with all our fans, that social media is about one-on-one conversations, and that we need to be personal in order to be successful. So, can big brands really build social media engagement?

    We don’t have a social media dictionary…yet. Concepts like engagement and measurement mean many things to many people. We do have best practices per se, but even those seem subjective. We hear experts telling us we have to interact with all our fans, that social media is about one-on-one conversations, and that we need to be personal in order to be successful. So, can big brands really build social media engagement?

    Are the best practices the same for the brand with 500 fans as they are for the brand with five million or more? The answer to that is yes and no. The key to the discussion has to do with scale, which is one of the most misunderstood concepts in marketing, in my experience. Scale has to do with the question of proportion and size. If I build a model of the Empire State Building, I have to do it to scale. There are features of the original design I have to alter to make it work, but when the model is done, it should look the same as the original.

    When a small school tries to copy a social media campaign by a bigger school, it probably doesn’t fail because the audiences are different in demographics, needs, or online habits, it is because the campaign wasn’t scaled correctly. You can engage with five million people without conversing with every fan--there, I said it. You don’t have to like every post, comment on every picture, or retweet every tweet that praises your brand. Honestly, that would look just plain silly and unauthentic.

    So what happens when you’re too big to interact with every fan? The key is to scale the strategy and not the tactic. In other words, your definition of engagement doesn’t change, but how you execute engagement does.  And how you execute engagement depends on a number of factors, one of which is size.

    Begin by understanding the brand operations where customer/fan interaction takes place, and how they can be scaled. One example is customer service: You do this whether you are a brand with 50 fans or 50 million fans. What changes as you grow in size is how you execute/scale that strategy to fit the 50 million. You may not be able to answer every phone call personally at 50 million, but you have systems in place at every stage of the sale (before, during, after) that scale to provide excellent customer service. Do you have an easy-to-find and relevant FAQ page on your website that can address customer’s basic needs as your first step? Do you have personal representatives on call, by social, email, and phone, that can answer priority questions? Have you developed brand advocates that will help you troubleshoot issues within their reach on social media? What makes a company like Zappos successful is not their extraordinary products, it’s their extraordinary service. And that scales at any size.

    Next, look at the methods you use to communicate in social media. How do these scale when you are a big brand?

    1. Broadcast

    Broadcast has become a dirty word in social media, and I am not sure why. Maybe it’s because it sounds impersonal. Broadcasting just means to send out and scatter over a large area. Sometimes, that is the necessary way to communicate. You can still broadcast and be personable, creative, receptive, innovative, or adding value. Those attributes don’t always require two-way interaction. It is possible to broadcast and connect.

    One easy way to change the way you broadcast is your voice. One of the biggest mistakes I see big brands make is writing in journalistic style rather than conversational style. There is a way to make your social media posts personal and connect emotionally to fans, even when you are broadcasting. Another one of the best ways is with good visuals. A picture is worth a thousand words and, if done well, they can connect deeply with our emotions. One word of warning: if broadcasting is your only method of social media communication, it will not build loyalty very quickly. And if you broadcast only to get your own message out without a thought to how it connects with your fans’ needs, you will fail.

    2. Interact

    I can hear you already. How in the heck can I interact with 50 million people? Well, it takes some work, but all interaction takes work. To me, social media is more about making a connection to a need than it is about actual back-and-forth interaction. The difference maker in connection is that audience size dictates a need to scale your tactics. Begin by understanding what it is about your brand that connects with people. If you are a sports brand it might be your players, your traditions or history, the real-time games, the fan rituals surrounding your games, your win/loss record (yes, they are called fair weather fans), your coaches, or even the statistics. If you understand those connection points, you can offer fans access to those connection points without having to actually touch base with everyone individually. Find ways to make your story their story.

    Just by looking at the partial list above we can see that different fans have different connection points. So, we interact with them by solving their problem—connecting them. Our social media content should be designed to give them access to all of the above—to make our story their story. It’s not just all about the fans, or all about you, it’s about bringing everybody into one experience. And remember that all content is not created equal. A picture may be worth a thousand words but some are only worth a few.

    3. Facilitate

    So how do we facilitate the connections? This is where the rubber meets the road. All a brand needs to do to succeed in social media is facilitate the connection that meets the needs of the fan. You’ve got something they want—give it to them in a way that makes a connection, not just hands off information. As Jay Baer said in Youtility, make yourself useful. The highest form of engagement comes when we facilitate a story that includes everybody’s needs. When we focus on what we want to say, we drop the ball. When we know what our fans want and give it to them, we are building a relationship because we are adding value to them. And in doing so, we are also meeting our own needs as well—dedicated loyal fans that will stick with us even when we lose. The need to connect doesn’t go away when we lose, it just looks different. Knowing those differences and understanding the tactics that facilitate that connection will carry big brands a long way towards building loyal fans in social media.

    There’s too much content. Someone had to say it. Someone did. Mark Schaeffer, a respected author, professor, consultant and leader in the field penned “Content Shock: Why content marketing is not a sustainable strategy.” Schaeffer opined the supply of content has surpassed demand. Mark warned, “Content shock is coming and I believe we are beginning to enter the danger zone now.”

    Content marketing’s shifted into full tilt boogie. Everyone’s into it. And I don’t just mean every company; sometimes it’s everyone in the company.

    The assistant pencil licker in the customer support department sketched out a plan to create the “Ultimate Guide to Pencil Licking.” It seems like a can’t miss idea, but darn it, page one SERP results reveal some very sharp content creators have already seized control of the pencil licking 101 space. 

    Shock, schlock and hickory dickory dock.

    There’s too much content. Someone had to say it. Someone did. Mark Schaeffer, a respected author, professor, consultant and leader in the field penned “Content Shock: Why content marketing is not a sustainable strategy.”

    Schaeffer opined the supply of content has surpassed demand. Mark warned, “Content shock is coming and I believe we are beginning to enter the danger zone now.”

    Not many members of the content marketing club missed the story. Content ambassadors far and wide responded and retorted, me among them. I questioned, “Is the problem content shock or content schlock?”

    I hope my point of view was clear. If we’re overly saturated, it’s because the flood of junk content has created white noise. Copyblogger’s Sonia Simone said it well.

    “We are a long way from the day when too much high-quality, Rainmaker-style content is being created. To repeat myself, there is not a glut of content that is useful, passionate, individual, and interesting.”

    I created a SlideShare and post about the phenomena I call “Nontent.” Nontent, of course, not only includes blogs, but all kinds of no or low-value content that fails to connect or convert. Then I thought I’d take I’d take a whack at identifying the ingredients required to create effective content that informs and inspires.

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    Let’s examine the ingredients.

    Purpose: If your first ingredient isn’t a purpose, there’s no point in creating content at all. Whether you’re going to create a how-to, list, story, opinion piece, roundup or anything else, you need to know the point you want to make and make it.

    What do you want the reader or viewer to take away? Remember, the battle you fight first and foremost is attention. When you get it, don’t waste it. Though a great lure may earn the click you seek, it’ll backfire if your reader’s expectation isn’t satisfied.

    Relevance: A content marketer exposes himself as a wanna-be when he fires before he aims. This reckless approach rears its ugly head when you concentrate on content, but not marketing. 

    Do the research and hard work up front to identify the relevant subject matter where your prospect’s needs and company’s strengths overlap. What pains your prospects? What gives them pleasure?

    Education: Effective content marketers solve problems. They make readers more informed and inspired. And to keep them coming back for more, they make the lessons fun.

    Think like a teacher. What will it take to deliver a great lesson?

    Emotional triggers: You can out-feature the competition by a long shot, but come up empty if you don’t push the right hot buttons.

    As a young student of advertising I learned emotions drive every kind of decision. The lesson holds true for content. In my post, “11 Feelings Great Writers Fondle,” I highlight many of the ways you can trip people’s triggers. Understand what it takes to get your reader to feel something.

    Timeliness or timelessness: Readers are going to want to know what’s new. You can get them to relate when you’re on top of what’s new, what’s now and what’s next.

    Of course, while change is imminent in every field, every game relies on fundamentals too. So while you’ll strive to create timely content when you can, your mix should also contain timeless lessons. In fact, you should make these content creation projects—often called “evergreen” content—your most substantial. You’ll be rewarded for a long time to come.

    Truth: In any form of media, or communications of any type, it’s dreadful to find lies or questionable claims. The best of them will stop trains and could get you all the attention you seek, but will inevitably derail you, possibly for good.

    Now I don’t suspect you’ll stoop so low, but I offer a “truth” warning to everyone, even the best-intentioned brand journalists with unquestionable integrity.

    Be über credible. Prove, demonstrate or backup every possible claim. Abstract superlatives and puffy proof points invoke my BS meter and I suspect I’m not alone. Cite your sources. Link to viable research. Include proof points. If you don’t want readers to doubt your claims, be undoubtedly accurate and earn the trust you have to have.

    Ease: First, some clarification. I’m not suggesting to make your content brief, or dominated by images, or bullet-heavy. I consider advice like this to be flawed.

    But you do indeed need to strive to make your content easy to consume. So your content should, in fact, be easy on the eyes and meaningful when skimmed. As I mentioned before, you fight for attention and must therefore respect your reader’s time. Look at long, detailed posts, eBooks and what have you and take cues from the ones designed well enough to squash your temptation to bail midstream.

    Originality: It’s excruciatingly difficult to teach you how to be original. Figure it out. The proliferation of content marketing has made blogs, infographics, eBooks, and every kind of content a sea of sameness.

    Can you develop a version of something you liked? Should you create content around popular topics? Is it okay if someone else’s great idea informs yours? Yes, yes, and yes. Your challenge is put a new spin on it.

    Voice: Sameness sucks. Everyday I read informative, but forgettable articles. In my opinion, the majority of content creators come up short because they play it safe. If I’m to become a fan (and therefore loyal consumer) of your content, you need to give me reasons to become a fan of you, the author or brand.

    Give me you. Your point of view. Your personality. Your ideals. I want to hear your voice. Some say how you say stuff is more important than what you say.

    Great headline or title: We have a bit of a no-brainer here, but still, headlines miss the mark in a variety of ways. Sometimes they promise far more than a post or program delivers. Often, they’re overly formulaic or bland. And more often than not, they simply don’t make me feel anything.

    The best headlines itch the reader’s brain. I submit when you write a headline that indicates what I’ll be reading while still creating a big curiosity gap, you have a winner.

    Friendliness: Nix the buzzwords and jargon. You read that all the time, right? Doesn’t seem to matter much. Gobbly gook still runs rampant. I can’t explain it. However, I can explain to content creators guilty of the “curse of knowledge” why their puffy prose fails to engage.

    Direction: A disease that’s crippling content marketing is a lack of marketing. It appears the well-understood notion that content should be useful often gets in the way of lead generation.

    By no means do I mean to be proposing you retreat to an advertising approach. However, content marketers need to be intimately acquainted with business objectives and execute accordingly.

    This means at the conclusion of any piece of content, you ask something of the prospect. It’s called a call to action. So call for action (or you won’t be doing content marketing for long).

    Shareability: I’m forever stunned by the oodles of stuff I read, view and listen to that fail to encourage sharing. Are content creators afraid to ask for shares? Are they oblivious to the idea they should?

    It seems preposterous, but a ton of very good content creators suck at social media. If you want to succeed in content marketing, social media is a necessary ingredient. No excuses accepted.

    There are sooooo many ways to encourage sharing, which of course, can increase your reach, engagement, credibility, trust, leads, sales, you name it. Start with a share bar. Sprinkle in some “click to tweet” prompts. Embed social media commentary widgets. This list could continue. If your website and blog lack shareability, go do something about it right now.

    Optimization: As is usually the case in my how-to posts, I’m not going to dwell on search optimization tactics. I’m simply going to remind you you need to understand them.

    You need not get all SEO-crazy. You simply need to include keywords and tags. You need to write compelling snippets for search engine listings. A fundamental understanding of how search engines index and present content is absolutely required.

    That’s a healthy list.

    There are 14 ingredients I believe will make your content tastier, better for you, and worthy of the audience you serve. You might reread this post or stick that pseudo nutritional label somewhere in sight when you create your next piece of content.

    Did I miss an ingredient? Please feel free to stir yours in.