3 Reasons Why Your Brand Should Start Podcasting

TomMartin
Tom Martin Founder, Converse Digital

Posted on July 3rd 2013

3 Reasons Why Your Brand Should Start Podcasting

benefits of podcasting

According to a 2012 Edison Research Study on the Podcast Listener awareness of podcasting has grown 105% since 2006 and the percentage of people indicating they have listened to an audio podcast has grown 163%. But access to a growing audience isn’t the only reason to consider adding podcasting to your marketing toolkit. Here are three key reasons you should start podcasting:

Podcasts last longer than blog posts

In today’s Internet ADD world, online readers are skimming more and reading less. This forces bloggers (both corporate and personal) to write shorter posts which lead prospects to spend less time with your brand. Because each session with your brand is short, it takes longer to create a sense of attachment between your prospect and your brand. But with the average podcast lasting anywhere from 5-minutes to an hour, the prospect is making a bigger commitment to your brand and your content.

Podcasts can expose new audiences to your brand

Because podcasts are indexed and offered on platforms like iTunes, podcasts are in some instances more discoverable than text based content. The only way prospective buyers will find your text content is via a search engine or referral on social media networks. However, with platforms like iTunes and Stitcher channel surfing for new podcasts is easy. Thus, podcasting offers your brand the chance to be discovered by buyers that wouldn’t otherwise seek you out or consume your content.

Podcasts are convenient to consume

Your buyer is increasingly grappling with managing their most precious resource – time. One of the greatest benefits of a podcast is your buyers’ ability to consume it while doing something else. Increasingly people are listening to podcasts while driving to/from work, while working out or during the work day. Thus, unlike text based and even video based content, which require your buyers’ undivided attention, podcasts can be consumed in the background.

If you want to learn more about podcasting, including the tools, applications and techniques that professional podcasters use to create their podcasts, you’ll love Chapter 13 of The Invisible Sale, where I cover all of this and more.

photo by: Mingo Hagen

 

TomMartin

Tom Martin

Founder, Converse Digital

Tom is 20+ year veteran of the marketing and advertising industry with a penchant for stiff drinks, good debates and digital gadgets. He is the founder of Converse Digital, author of The Invisible Sale, and a contributing writer for Advertising Age. Tom guides clients through the digital marketing maze and helps companies teach their sales force how to Painlessly Prospect their way to more sales. Connect with him on Google.

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Comments

Propel Bizworks
Posted on July 3rd 2013 at 8:27PM

I definitely see that podcasting can expose a business to a different group of customers, so, for that reason alone, it might be worth at least giving a test-run. The difficult thing for me to fully believe with podcasting is, with our continuing trend toward shorter and shorter attention spans (equating to shorter, more concise messages and content), how many people will, on a regular basis, log-on (or download) and consume 5-, 10-, or 60-minute episodes. The content certainly needs to be stellar to hold someone's attention . . . and convince him/her to keep coming back for more.

 

Thaks for this post, Tom!

TomMartin
Posted on July 5th 2013 at 6:48PM

That's the beauty of the new podcasting apps. No need to log in or download - new episodes are pushed to the phone automatically. 

Propel Bizworks
Posted on July 8th 2013 at 6:10PM

Good point there, Tom- that definitely does remove at least that one time-consuming part of the process. Thanks for both the article and the reply!