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Is Social Media the Biggest Workplace Distraction? [INFOGRAPHIC]

The other day I had an interesting Twitter conversation with a fellow who thought it was ironic that I sent out a tweet about time management, because social media was a “time waster.” It occurred to me that the difference between social media as a waste of time and as a productive action probably is just a matter of intention. Of course that point was lost on this one disagreeable fellow.

When I saw this infographic, I thought of his “time wasting comment” and how any one of these activities (including daydreaming) could be construed as both productive or a waste of time depending upon intent. What do you think? Are these activities time wasters? Is social media?

social media in the workplace

Image was provided to Wikimedia Commons by the National Archives and Records Administration as part of a cooperation project. The National Archives and Records Administration provides images depicting American and global history which are public domain or licensed under a free license.
Infographic by Yast

 

Join The Conversation

  • philbutler's picture
    Jun 9 Posted 1 year ago philbutler

    This is funny Jim, I was just talking about distractions in our offices the other day. My partner and I were laughing (and half crying) at having hired some stikingly beautiful and unerringly humorous employees. At times they seem a bit worthless for their incessant eyeballing of one anthother. 

    Maybe another inforgraphic on "specific" distractions is in order? 

    Always, 

    Phil

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