Twitter Stats That Will Get You Tweeting -- 100%

michellecarvill
Michelle Carvill Marketing Consultant, Carvill Creative

Posted on August 26th 2011

Twitter Stats That Will Get You Tweeting -- 100%


Are you unsure about setting up an account on Twitter? Maybe you feel like it’s not right for your brand or your line of work, maybe you think that anything you would have to say would fall on deaf ears because your target audience don’t use twitter. Maybe you’re wrong…Twitter_128

The following statistics will prove that Twitter is fast and furiously becoming the social media platform used by everyone. The stats should show that it doesn’t matter if you are female, male, have kids …if you are wealthy, broke, employed or looking for work – you still have an audience on Twitter. Take a look and see for yourself – the stats also show that even if you haven’t got a presence on Twitter, people could still be talking about you….so maybe you should be listening?

Over the last 5 years -

  • There are 200,000,000 registered Twitter users  
  • Almost 88% of people have awareness of Twitter and its existence
  • There are 450,000 new Twitter accounts created everyday
  • Meaning there are 5.2 accounts created every second of everyday

So we can longer claim that’s it unknown – there is a huge audience out there, right at your fingertips. That is a lot of people in a short space of time that have been convinced by its power.

  • There are one billion tweets posted every week
  • 180,000,000 everyday
  • 138,888 every minute
  • Over 1,650 every second
  • Just 5% of Twitter users create 75% of the content tweeted  
  • There are 1.6 billion search queries everyday
  • Meaning that there are 18,000 search queries every second

Still worried that you’re too old to be using it or that your brand or company is the wrong sort to be using twitter? Take a look at the numbers then…

  • 46% of Twitter users are female
  • 54% are male – very equal demographics
  • 53% don’t have children
  • 47% do have children – time doesn’t seem to be an issue
  • The majorty of twitter users are aged between 30 and 49  - perfect age group
  • 43% of people follow a brand on Twitter for special deals/offers
  • 75% of users are more likely to purchase from a brand they follow – good headstart
  • 67% of users are likely to recommend a brand they follow to other users

Ok….but maybe you’re still worried about the freedom of speech that users have. The fact that anyone can write anything about you, your brand, your services or your skills…

  • 1,000,000 people view tweets about customer service each week
  • 80% of those tweets are negative and critical
  • As much as 75% of traffic comes from sources outside Twitter

We’ll let you in on a secret – whether you have a twitter account or not people can write whatever they want, whenever they want – they will get heard and it will get commented on and it will get passed on. Surely it’s better to be listening in on those criticisms, dealing with them and changing things for the better. Let people know you’re listening.

Maybe you don’t have a brand or a company or even a job – we’ve got a stat that should get you tweeting nonetheless

  • Up to 85% of companies are using social media as part of their recruitment

Or maybe you don’t have the time to be on twitter in the middle of the day and therefore think you would miss out on most activity anyway….

  • 5pm is the best time to be retweeted

So no excuses then? Looks like Twitter has an answer for everything….

If you have anything you’d like to add to this blog post – please feel free to send comments our way.

 

 

michellecarvill

Michelle Carvill

Marketing Consultant, Carvill Creative

Vikki Mills is Social Media and Marketing Executive at Carvill Creative – the online visibility experts. A digital marketing and design agency based in Maidenhead, Berkshire. The agency covers all aspects of online visibility – covering social media marketing and social media training, user focused website planning and conversion focused website design.
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Comments

Posted on August 26th 2011 at 6:11AM

Thank you for this lovely post. The statistics are really interesting.

Posted on August 26th 2011 at 8:34AM

Excellent work, thank you!

Posted on August 26th 2011 at 9:56AM

These stats are cool to read but their relevance to small biz is not clear. If "Just 5% of Twitter users create 75% of the content tweeted" that means that the vast majority of the noise on Twitter is being generated by corporations with armies of social media staff incessantly tweeting. These corporations are not likely to read my tweets, nevermind buy from me.

Take those corporate tweeters out of your numbers, and they look much less impressive.

Don't get me wrong... I think Twitter is great... but I don't think that there is anything in the article that truly explains to a small biz owner why Twitter is good for them. If anything it gives them a false idea that it will give them "access" to 200 million fellow tweeters. 

Umm... not exactly...

Posted on August 29th 2011 at 12:19AM

Naomi, in my opinion, twitter is a farily "leveling" medium.  While it is true that large corporations can put more resources behind their social media efforts than small businesses, Twitter's strength is being able to have a one-on-one conversation that just happens to be in front of tons of people.  

The best use of twitter for brands of all sizes is to communicate with their customers.  Customers no longer send emails or call the 800 number with a complaint.  They tweet.  It is fast and easy.  If small businesses set up a Twitter account only to be ready to engage with their customers who have something to say about their brand, they are ahead of the game.  

With the social media monitoring tools out there, it is easy to stay on top of the relevant tweets and help your brand.  Through these tools, brands can search for key words (like their brand name or products they sell) to find places where they can start or participate in a conversation.  And it is through these conversations where relationships can start, consumers can turn into customers and one-time customers can turn into loyal customers.  

Twitter is huge, just look at the stats again.  But small businesses need only to focus on the small part where they live. 

Posted on August 26th 2011 at 10:31AM

Hello & thanks for a great article!!

 

The numbers just don't lie, do they!

 

It's good to see Twitter keeping up to date now & not being so complacent!

 

To me apps like Buffer are essential to good Twitter distribution and if used well can really help your Klout score! I'd recommend Twit Cleaner to, keeps the spam bots away!

 

If you Tweet a lot & really wnat to benefit from all your Twitter work, I'd recommend Twylah too, Twlah's great!!

 

Thanks again, best regards, Peter

 

 

Posted on August 26th 2011 at 11:29AM

 

Do you cite the source for your statistics? It's not that I doubt them; I am just curious about their origin.

I agree with the overall thrust of your post, though.

 

 

Posted on August 26th 2011 at 3:00PM

I agree with Naomi. The stats can be misleading for small companies, but then again, there's not much to lose with opening a twitter account. Try it for yourself and let your results dictate your ultimate decision.

Posted on August 27th 2011 at 5:21AM

This article has good statistics but missed two key stats.  How many twitter accounts are active and how do brands monetize twitter.

Twitter takes up a lot of time and at present I can't see any rewards.

 

Posted on August 28th 2011 at 9:36PM

These Twitter stats are interesting though I doubt the validity of the number of users that sign up everyday. Maybe out of 10, only 1 or 2 accounts are valid.

Posted on September 1st 2011 at 5:52PM

A wise economist once told me that "if you torture a statistic long enough, it will always tell you what you want to hear".

So it is with this post. What is the point of these statistics other to impress people with the concept of marketing to the mass?

Marketing today is about niches and specialty markets, not the mass marketing of 20 years ago. 

I'm not saying Twitter is bad or not useful. Just that using mass statistics like this sends a false message to, especially, small businesses. They can tweet all day long and never see a result. Yes, occasionally, a customer may complain about them on Twitter, but it would be rare -- the customer would be more likely to complain to them directly.

For a small business, Twitter works much better as a thought leadership channel, or a local community building tool -- if the business sees value in that. 

Posted on September 1st 2011 at 9:59PM

Great stats  - but I tend to agree with Susie and Naomi above  - what do they mean?  It would be great if we also had stats on readership and engagement of theses tweets - what actions are being taken - how is it being used successful.

Is the activity behind live commentary amongst attendees of a web conference or live commentary while viewing a TV show or event? There's use/validity on that

Ask yourself - how do you use twitter? most people with 10,000 followers + have that number because they follow those same 10,000 accounts that follow them - and be real - do they really read every tweet from all 10,000 twitters?

Here's a prime example where hype and sheer numbers - a success does not make.  

The one value I see in twitter is the amount of data that it generates on general sentiment and trends that can only be meaningful if you use a good web monitoring service like Radian6 or ListenLogic to prepare insights reports on what it means to you. 

A second one is for true real time customer service - which well executed is cheaper than an 800 number or web-chat

Please get back to me as soon as engagement numbers are available. [email protected], htttp://jrgrana.com

Posted on September 2nd 2011 at 8:36AM

Wait wait wait - I can't stand it when people dump a bunch of aggregated data and say there look it's great you need to be there.  Same thing is done with Facebook.   This is at best a 1 to a handful medium and therefore xxx millions of people really don't matter.  Don't get all huffy and throw up some Arab Spring reference.   The fact is Twitter is less important to a diner in the middle of nowhere, when that diner owner stats with zero followers.  

Stats must have context to the end user to be relevant and to acutally make a case for using or not using a social channel.  What supports my point is the stat in this piece  5% of Twitter users produce 75% of the content. Yikes.  Sounds more like the early days of television when there were only 3 networks.  Is that why companies are drooling over Klout numbers?  

 

I appreciate these Fun Facts for what they are - Trivia - Nice bullets for a presentation, but I've been around too long, given too many presentations to CEOs that ask, "So what does this mean exactly."  To them my response is this.  

A) Do you really want to have an exchange with individuals?

B) is your organization structured to address a variety of questions?

C) What exactly do you want by being on Twitter?

D) Twitter is radio, you understand that right? A fraction of people would see your 140 or less characters in probably less than a minute's time and then it's essentailly gone. Now how big is Twitter again?

 

The above is the description of Twitter in 99% of the cases.  You can't pull out Kevin Smith's airplane ejection, Dave Carroll's guitar break, or Motrins' Moms example as say that's a great reason to be on Twitter for every company.  I might work for huge consumer products companies, but these numbers do not support a blanket rationale to be on twitter. 

Posted on September 2nd 2011 at 3:22PM
Posted on October 3rd 2011 at 11:22AM

When I was reading this, I did chuckle out loud at the stat of 75% of all content is generated by 5% of users, and I was slightly surprised to see it in there (although I'm very glad it was) as it does go against the rest of the stats a little. And then was pleased to see from the comments that other people noticed this too.

I saw a Twitter representative do a talk at AdTech in London last October and they said how - I'm afraid I can't remember but some really high number - of Twitter accounts are active, and then I read something shortly afterwards saying that isn't the case at all. It would be really interesting to know. I know I've set them up for clients or projects with the best of intentions but then they haven't got used. Plus all the spam ones there must be.

Interesting stats about demographics etc. - key marketing audience. But I'm still just not convinced that real people use it as much as they may be claimed to. Not to say they won't more in the future though.

Always, always interesting to read figures like this, so thanks for the post.

Lisa x